Alumni Stories

  • April 14, 2017

    Planting seeds of success at an agricultural biotech company

    When Luke Porisch began working for Valent BioSciences in 2012, he was the lone employee in the office, a white farmhouse in a sleepy Iowa town of 3,500 people.

  • April 12, 2017

    Graduate alumni reunion and symposium highlights collaborative trajectories

    Graduate alumni returned to campus on April 7 for a reunion and symposium celebrating the history, scholarship, and future of the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).

  • March 27, 2017

    Seeking genuine collaboration with artificial intelligence

    Popular culture sometimes paints a bleak picture of interactions between artificial intelligence and humans (think “2001: A Space Odyssey” or “Blade Runner”). Alumna Ece Kamar, Ph.D. ’10, doesn’t see it that way.

    Kamar, who earned her graduate degree in computer science at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), studies how humans and machines can work together.

  • March 22, 2017

    Throughout its 170 year history—and under several different names—the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has continued to make pathbreaking advances, many of which build on the research of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) alumni in engineering and applied sciences.

  • March 16, 2017

    Alumna’s creativity takes flight at commercial drone startup

    Blue-sky thinking helps alumna Carolina Ragolta, A.B. ’13, navigate the largely uncharted territory of the commercial drone industry.

    Ragolta, who concentrated in biomedical engineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), is charting a new course of her own, as the first product manager at commercial drone startup Kespry.

  • February 23, 2017

    This entrepreneur is using computer science to help the military detect IEDs

    Lahiru Jayatilaka’s native Sri Lanka was ripped apart by a 26-year civil war. By the time a peace agreement was signed in 2009, the armed conflict had claimed more than 100,000 lives. But then a new deadly enemy emerged: undetonated landmines. 

  • February 17, 2017

    Alumna uses big data and machine learning to help homeowners cut energy costs

    Crank up the A/C and the temperature in the house starts falling. Simple, right?

    Not quite, says alumna Marissa Hummon, Ph.D. ’09, senior energy scientist at Tendril. Turning on a home’s air conditioner requires an automatically-controlled generator operated by the local utility company to put out a little bit more power to meet those energy demands.

  • February 9, 2017

    First Sophomore Convocation brings students, alumni together

    The newest members of the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) were welcomed into the SEAS community during the first-ever Sophomore Convocation on Feb. 7.

  • January 24, 2017

    West Bank’s first boutique winemaker plants a successful enterprise    

    When the first bottles of Canaan Khoury’s Palestinian wine arrive in U.S. stores later this year, it will mark a full-circle journey for both the Khoury family and their new business.

  • January 23, 2017

    The building blocks of a better battery

    The smartphone in your pocket is a treasure-trove of technological innovations, from the fingerprint scanner used for login to the organic light-emitting diode that illuminates the screen. However, one critical piece of smartphone technology hasn’t had much of an upgrade since it was commercialized in 1991—the rechargeable lithium ion battery that powers the device.

Pages