Four students received special recognition for innovation and ingenuity as the inaugural recipients of the Dean’s Award for Outstanding Engineering Projects. Harry R. Lewis, Interim Dean of the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science, presented the awards during the fourth annual SEAS Design & Project Fair on May 8.

The four finalists were selected by faculty members for having the best projects in Engineering Design Projects (ES100), a yearlong capstone course for seniors in the S.B. engineering program. During the semester, each student designs and completes a project that solves a specific problem. The finalists were:

  • Robert Flitsch, mechanical engineering and computer science, for his project Additive Manufacturing Ice Resurfacing Robot (adviser: Katia Bertoldi, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences)
  • Tyler Kugler, electrical engineering, for his project WeighTrack 2.0 (advisers: Marko Loncar, Tiantsai Lin Professor of Electrical Engineering, and Marco Rivero, electrical engineer)
  • Emily Rogers, engineering sciences, for her project Assistive Exoskeleton for Injury Prevention During Downhill Walking (advisers: Dónal Holland, visiting lecturer in engineering sciences, and Panos Polygerinos, postdoctoral fellow)
  • Kriti Subramanyam, engineering sciences, for her project siRNA-Loaded Lipogels for Metastatic Breast Cancer Inhibition (advisers: Peng Guo and Marsha Moses of Boston Children’s Hospital)

Each finalist received a certificate and $500.

In addition, the following students received honorable mention awards during the Design & Project Fair:

  • Jonathan Budd, electrical engineering
  • Ansel Duff, mechanical engineering
  • Leah Gaffney, bioengineering
  • Carter Ithier, mechanical engineering
  • Bethany Kanten, electrical engineering
  • Jillian Lee, bioengineering
  • Ronit Malka, bioengineering
  • Alex Miller, bioengineering
  • Raquel Schreiber, engineering sciences
  • Stephanie Warner, engineering sciences