Combining with Other Areas

Because of the program’s flexible requirements, students can easily pursue related (or often unrelated) interests, from music to psychology.

There are several ways to pursue outside interests.

Electives

Even if you are in an Honors program, a significant portion of your coursework is committed neither to your concentration nor to General Education requirements.

Joint Concentrations

This option is for students with a serious interest both in computer science and in an area that is foundational to the study of computing (e.g., mathematics or statistics) or where computing is being applied in significant ways. Note that a joint concentration is not a “double major.” The two fields must overlap in a way that will enable the candidate to write a senior thesis acceptable to both departments. 

The Mind, Brain, and Behavior (MBB) Program

Students interested in addressing questions of neuroscience and cognition from the perspective of computer science may pursue a special program of study affliated with the University-wide Mind, Brain, and Behavior Initiative that allows them to participate in a variety of related activities.

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)

If you want to study hardware (e.g., chips, circuits, and memory) as well as software, consider pursuing Electrical Engineering and Computer Science track as part of the Engineering Sciences concentration. This is distinct from, but parallel to, the Computer Science concentration.

Secondary Fields

Sometimes the most flexible way of pursuing and getting recognition for another field in addition to Computer Science is to do one or the other as a Secondary Field. Requirements for Computer Science as a Secondary are simple.