Engineering Sciences Courses

For more information on specific courses, including prerequisites, registration details and any last-minute changes, visit my.harvard

Introduction to Environmental Science and Engineering

ENG-SCI 6
2018 Spring
Elsie Sunderland,
Patrick Ulrich
Tuesday, Thursday
11:30 am to 12:59 pm

This course will provide students with an introduction to current topics in environmental science and engineering by providing: an overview of current environmental issues, critically evaluating their underlying science and knowledge limitations, and exploring the best-available engineering solutions to some of our most pressing environmental problems. The course will emphasize the interconnected biological, geological, and chemical cycles of the earth system (biogeochemical cycles) and how human activity affects these natural cycles within each of the major environmental compartments (atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial).

How to Create Things and Have Them Matter

ENG-SCI 20
2018 Spring
David Edwards
Monday
1:00 pm to 4:59 pm

This course teaches students to generate, develop and realize ideas that change how we think and live.  Students are invited to imagine far-ranging ideas with special attention to mindful aesthetic process and form.  Individual ideas are complemented by a collective maker experience aimed to teach collaborative creator skills and openness to public dialog.  Students form teams to design unusual beverage experiences through ice and wood design.  These designs form the props of student-designed Drink Opera, a kind of sensory improvisation illustrative of behavior-altering idea exchange, which students present in a public setting at the end of the semester.  Students spend a weekend in Maine working with wood artists and learn from entrepreneurs, bar tenders, scientists and artists. Case study and conceptual readings will complement student idea exploration.

The Innovator's Practice: Finding, Building and Leading Good Ideas with Others

ENG-SCI 21
2017 Fall
Beth Altringer
Monday, Wednesday
9:00 am to 10:59 am

Students gain experience overcoming many under-represented challenges of becoming an innovator, including: identifying your intrinsic motivations, finding related good ideas, working effectively with others to develop them, and leading innovative professional projects to implementation. Students apply human-centered design processes (observing, interpreting, ideating, testing, refining, planning) to stimulate innovation, negotiate, strategize, and build and lead cooperative teams. Features guest speakers from industry, academia, and involves collaborating with cutting-edge companies.

Design Survivor: Experiential Lessons in Designing for Desirability

ENG-SCI 22
2018 Spring
Beth Altringer
Monday, Wednesday
9:00 am to 10:59 am

Multi-disciplinary course for students interested in designing products and services that are simple, irresistible, delightful, cool, covetable, viral, and, increasingly these days, much more likely to be successful. Students study real world cases of how organizations (e.g., Apple, Gucci, Swarovski) strategically design for desirability. In weekly design challenges, students use analogical transfer to apply these insights to diverse industries and target markets (e.g., health literacy campaigns, declining technologies, the future of luxury). Weekly critique panels with experts enable students to develop their own design point of view and to finish with a diverse design portfolio.

Flavor Molecules of Food Fermentation: Exploration and Inquiry

ENG-SCI 24
2018 Spring
Pia Sorensen
Tuesday, Thursday
2:30 pm to 4:29 pm

Course description: Microorganisms produce a diverse array of specialized small molecules as part of their metabolic processes. In this course we will study the production, properties, and characterization of these molecules through the lens of food fermentation. In particular, we will focus on the small molecules that contribute taste and aroma in fermented foods. Students will experience the scientific inquiry process in a creative way by designing and implementing their own research project based on a fermented food of their choosing. Still a field with much potential for discovery, interested students are invited to continue their research project in the summer.

Engineering the Acoustical World

ENG-SCI 25
2018 Spring
Robert Wood
Tuesday, Thursday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

How does Shazam know what song is playing? Why do some rooms have better acoustics than others? Do high-end musical instruments sound better than cheap ones? How does Spotify  predict your next favorite song? How is music stored and manipulated in a digital form? This class explores these and related themes in an accessible way for non-engineering concentrators. The class is driven by hands-on group projects to enhance your technical literacy, a critical skill for anyone designing solutions to today’s most pressing and complex issues. The projects are designed so that the creativity of students in all fields will have a role to play. Lectures, demonstrations, and guest lecturers/performers are integrated into the class to build foundational knowledge and to inspire. We will also explore wider social themes related to music and acoustics. The class is approached from an engineering perspective, using music and musical instruments as the framework to introduce a broad array of concepts in physics, mathematics, and engineering. Requires no previous exposure to physics or calculus beyond the high school level.

Humanity and its Challenges: Systems Thinking and Engineering Design Solutions

ENG-SCI 26
2017 Fall
Cherry Murray,
Vikram Mansharamani
Monday
8:30 am to 10:59 am

As citizens in a rapidly changing world facing increasingly complex challenges, the skills that tomorrow’s leaders will need are increasingly crossing disciplinary silos. Yet humanity’s most pressing problems are interconnected, involve competing interests, and defy such simplification. Reductionist approaches focused on linear understanding must be balanced against the integrative logic of systems-oriented thinking. This course is designed to give students an appreciation for the complexities of today’s most intractable problems, and in so doing, help students develop a framework necessary for navigating the world they will face.

Humanity and its Challenges: Systems Thinking and Engineering Design Solutions

ENG-SCI 26
2018 Spring
Cherry Murray,
Vikram Mansharamani
Monday
8:30 am to 10:59 am

As citizens in a rapidly changing world facing increasingly complex challenges, the skills that tomorrow’s leaders will need are increasingly crossing disciplinary silos. Yet humanity’s most pressing problems are interconnected, involve competing interests, and defy such simplification. Reductionist approaches focused on linear understanding must be balanced against the integrative logic of systems-oriented thinking. This course is designed to give students an appreciation for the complexities of today’s most intractable problems, and in so doing, help students develop a framework necessary for navigating the world they will face.

Introduction to Computational Design

ENG-SCI 29
2017 Fall
Panagiotis Michalatos
Tuesday, Thursday
8:30 am to 9:59 am

This is an introductory course to computational design and the prerequisite for a spring course that deals with more advanced topics in the field. This course is primarily intended for designers with little background in programming who are interested in developing their skills in order to be able to better understand, interface with and customize the digital tools they are using, or develop their own software and interactive applications. The course introduces students to fundamental concepts and techniques in computational design. By the term "computational design" we mean an ad hoc set of methods borrowed from computer science, computational geometry and other fields, and adapted to specific design problems such as design development, fabrication, analysis, interaction and communication.

Introduction to Electrical Engineering

ENG-SCI 50
2017 Fall
Christopher Lombardo
Monday, Wednesday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

The main course objectives are to introduce students to the exciting and powerful world of electrical engineering and to explain how gadgets that we use every day actually work. After taking ES 50, you will be able to leverage the power of electricity to build systems that sense, control and program the physical world around you. Examples include intelligent and autonomous systems (robots), audio amplifiers (e.g. guitar amp), interactive art installations, light-shows, mind-controlled machines, and so on.

Computer-Aided Machine Design

ENG-SCI 51
2017 Fall
Conor Walsh,
Nathaniel Taylor
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
10:00 am to 10:59 am

A first course in the design and construction of mechanical and electromechanical devices. Engineering graphics and sketching; dimensions and tolerances. Introduction to materials selection and structural design. Machine elements and two-dimensional mechanisms; DC motors. Design methodology. Emphasis on laboratory work and design projects using professional solid modeling CAD software and numerically controlled machine tools.

Computer-Aided Machine Design

ENG-SCI 51
2018 Spring
Nathaniel Taylor
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
10:00 am to 10:59 am

A first course in the design and construction of mechanical and electromechanical devices. Engineering graphics and sketching; dimensions and tolerances. Introduction to materials selection and structural design. Machine elements and two-dimensional mechanisms; DC motors. Design methodology. Emphasis on laboratory work and design projects using professional solid modeling CAD software and numerically controlled machine tools.

The Joy of Electronics - Part I

ENG-SCI 52
2017 Fall
David Abrams
Monday, Wednesday
1:00 pm to 2:29 pm

Introduction to designing circuits to solve real problems. Two lecture and two lab sessions a week blend instruction with hands-on lab work to emphasize understanding, building and testing circuits. The course incorporates useful design experiences from day one. Covered topics include amplication, feedback, impedance, stability, filtering, switching, digital logic, microcontrollers, and more. The class ends with an open ended project that challenges students to build on core concepts.

The Joy of Electronics - Part I

ENG-SCI 52
2018 Spring
David Abrams
Monday, Wednesday
11:30 am to 12:59 pm

Introduction to designing circuits to solve real problems. Two lecture and two lab sessions a week blend instruction with hands-on lab work to emphasize understanding, building and testing circuits. The course incorporates useful design experiences from day one. Covered topics include amplication, feedback, impedance, stability, filtering, switching, digital logic, microcontrollers, and more. The class ends with an open ended project that challenges students to build on core concepts.

Quantitative Physiology as a Basis for Bioengineering

ENG-SCI 53
2017 Fall
Linsey Moyer
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
12:00 pm to 12:59 pm

A foundation in human organ systems physiology, including cardiac, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, and neural systems. Quantitative description of organ systems function and control in terms of physical principles and physiologic mechanisms. Simple mathematical models representing key aspects of organ systems function. Emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which dysfunction in these systems gives rise to common human disease processes, with an introduction to biomedical devices designed to treat dysfunction. The course is designed for freshman and sophomores.

Supervised Reading and Research

ENG-SCI 91R 001
2017 Fall
Zhiming Kuang,
Patrick Ulrich,
Christopher Lombardo,
Linsey Moyer

Guided reading and research.

Supervised Reading and Research

ENG-SCI 91R 002
2017 Fall
Christopher Lombardo

Guided reading and research.

Supervised Reading and Research

ENG-SCI 91R
2018 Spring
Zhiming Kuang,
Patrick Ulrich,
Christopher Lombardo,
Linsey Moyer

Guided reading and research.

Startup R & D

ENG-SCI 95R
2017 Fall
Paul Bottino
Thursday
4:00 pm to 5:59 pm

Students do field-based work in entrepreneurship to develop their existing startup and explore new ideas and opportunities for startup design. The course is for students seeking innovation experience as a founder of a startup. Students may work individually; teams are preferred. Requires self-directed, independent work and active outreach to mentors, customers, and partners for guidance and feedback in addition to that provided by the instructor. Students will share their work regularly and engage in a peer-to-peer feedback forum. The coursework is customized to the needs of each student and their startup role and includes development of product, technology, market, business, organization and leadership.

Startup R & D

ENG-SCI 95R
2018 Spring
Paul Bottino
Thursday
4:00 pm to 5:59 pm

Students do field-based work in entrepreneurship to develop their existing startup and explore new ideas and opportunities for startup design. The course is for students seeking innovation experience as a founder of a startup. Students may work individually; teams are preferred. Requires self-directed, independent work and active outreach to mentors, customers, and partners for guidance and feedback in addition to that provided by the instructor. Students will share their work regularly and engage in a peer-to-peer feedback forum. The coursework is customized to the needs of each student and their startup role and includes development of product, technology, market, business, organization and leadership.

Engineering Problem Solving and Design Project

ENG-SCI 96
2017 Fall
David Mooney
Monday, Wednesday
9:00 am to 10:59 am

Semester-long team project that provides engineering experience working with clients on real-world problems. Projects provide exposure to problem definition, performance measurement, quantitative analysis, modeling, generation of creative solutions, engineering design trade-offs, and documentation/communication skills. Ordinarily taken in the junior year.

Engineering Problem Solving and Design Project

ENG-SCI 96
2018 Spring
Fawwaz Habbal,
Christopher Lombardo,
Kelly Miller
Monday, Wednesday
11:00 am to 12:59 pm

Semester-long team project that provides engineering experience working with clients on real-world problems. Projects provide exposure to problem definition, performance measurement, quantitative analysis, modeling, generation of creative solutions, engineering design trade-offs, and documentation/communication skills. Ordinarily taken in the junior year.

Engineering Design Projects

ENG-SCI 100HFA
2017 Fall
Robert Wood,
Christopher Lombardo,
Patrick Ulrich,
Linsey Moyer,
Anas Chalah,
Nathaniel Taylor
Wednesday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

Individual engineering design projects which demonstrate mastery of engineering knowledge and techniques. During the year, each student will pursue an appropriate capstone project which involves both engineering design and quantitative analysis and culminating in a final oral presentation and final report/thesis.  Students must complete both parts of this course, fall and spring, in order to receive credit.

Engineering Design Projects

ENG-SCI 100HFB
2018 Spring
Robert Wood,
Christopher Lombardo,
Patrick Ulrich,
Linsey Moyer,
Anas Chalah,
Nathaniel Taylor

Individual engineering design projects which demonstrate mastery of engineering knowledge and techniques. During the year, each student will pursue an appropriate capstone project which involves both engineering design and quantitative analysis and culminating in a final oral presentation and final report/thesis.  Students must complete both parts of this course, fall and spring, in order to receive credit. 

Introduction to Scientific Computing

ENG-SCI 111
2017 Fall
Robin Wordsworth
Tuesday, Thursday
1:00 pm to 2:29 pm

Many complex physical problems defy simple analytical solutions or even accurate analytical approximations. Scientific computing can address certain of these problems successfully, providing unique insight. This course introduces some of the widely used techniques in scientific computing through examples chosen from physics, chemistry, and biology. The purpose of the course is to introduce methods that are useful in applications and research and to give the students hands-on experience with these methods.

Thermodynamics by Case Study

ENG-SCI 112
2018 Spring
Scot Martin
Wednesday, Friday
1:00 pm to 2:29 pm

Fundamental concepts and formalisms of conservation of energy and increase of entropy as applied to natural and engineered environmental and biological systems. Pedagogical approach is to start with real-world observations and applications, extracting the underlying fundamentals of thermodynamics from these.

Mathematical Modeling

ENG-SCI 115
2017 Fall
Ariel Amir
Tuesday, Thursday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

Abstracting the essential components and mechanisms from a natural system to produce a mathematical model, which can be analyzed with a variety of formal mathematical methods, is perhaps the most important, but least understood, task in applied mathematics. This course approaches a number of problems without the prejudice of trying to apply a particular method of solution. Topics drawn from biology, economics, engineering, physical and social sciences.

Mathematical Modeling

ENG-SCI 115
2018 Spring
Zhiming Kuang
Monday, Wednesday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

Abstracting the essential components and mechanisms from a natural system to produce a mathematical model, which can be analyzed with a variety of formal mathematical methods, is perhaps the most important, but least understood, task in applied mathematics. This course approaches a number of problems without the prejudice of trying to apply a particular method of solution. Topics drawn from biology, economics, engineering, physical and social sciences.

Introduction to the Mechanics of Solids

ENG-SCI 120
2018 Spring
Joost Vlassak
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
1:00 pm to 1:59 pm

A first course in the mechanical sciences which introduces elements of continuum mechanics and explains how materials and structures stretch, bend, twist, shake, buckle, and break. Stress-strain behavior of materials. Statically determinate and indeterminate structures. Stress and strain, equations of motion or equilibrium, strain-displacement relations. Torsion. Beam theory with applications to beam deflections, vibrations, and buckling. Three laboratory sessions required.

Introduction to Optimization: Models and Methods

ENG-SCI 121
2017 Fall
Yiling Chen
Monday, Wednesday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

Introduction to basic mathematical ideas and computational methods for solving deterministic and stochastic optimization problems. Topics covered: linear programming, integer programming, branch-and-bound, branch-and-cut, Markov chains, Markov decision processes. Emphasis on modeling. Examples from business, society, engineering, sports, e-commerce. Exercises in AMPL, complemented by Maple or Matlab.

Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes

ENG-SCI 123
2018 Spring
Shmuel Rubinstein
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
10:00 am to 10:59 am

Dimensional analysis. Basic elements of steady and unsteady thermal conduction and mass diffusion. Statics and dynamics of fluids. Buoyancy-stability and hydrostatics. Laminar viscous flows, potential flows, origin of lift, and basic aspects of boundary layers. Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. Applications in aerodynamics, chemical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, and physics.

Mechanical Systems

ENG-SCI 125
2017 Fall
Katia Bertoldi
Monday, Wednesday
1:00 pm to 2:29 pm

Modeling and analysis of mechanical and electromechanical systems. Topics include 3D rigid body dynamics, resonance, damping, frequency response, Laplace transform methods, Lagrange's equations, multiple degree-of-freedom systems and an introduction to nonlinear vibration, continuous systems, and control. Analytical modeling will be supplemented with numerical simulations and lab experiments. Laboratory exercises will explore vibration, stabilization, and nonlinear systems using data acquisition systems.

Computational Solid and Structural Mechanics

ENG-SCI 128
2018 Spring
Katia Bertoldi
Tuesday, Thursday
1:00 pm to 2:29 pm

Introduction to finite element methods for analysis of steady-state and transient problems in solid, structural, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Implementation of simple MATLAB codes and use of existing general-purpose programs (ABAQUS and COMSOL).

Biogeochemistry of Carbon Dioxide and Methane

ENG-SCI 130
2018 Spring
Steven Wofsy
Monday, Friday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

A comprehensive study of the major carbon-containing gases in the atmosphere (CO2 and CH4), emphasizing biogeochemical processes in the oceans, land and atmosphere that regulate their global abundances, plus the human-controlled processes and multiple feedbacks that perturb them. Roles in energy balance, air chemistry and pollution, and stratospheric chemistry will be studied.  The course emphasizes active learning, including hands on data analysis of global, regional, and ecosystem observations and creation of models for understanding the cycles and their responses to a changing environment. Students develop research projects throughout the course, and present them publicly in lieu of a final exam.

Introduction to Physical Oceanography and Climate

ENG-SCI 131
2018 Spring
Eli Tziperman
Tuesday, Thursday
1:00 pm to 2:29 pm

Observations and dynamics of the oceans, from local beach waves to the effects of the oceans on global climate. Topics covered include wave motions such as ocean surface waves, internal waves, tsunamis and tides; currents, including the wind driven circulation and the Gulf stream; coastal upwelling and fisheries; temperature, salinity, the overturning thermohaline circulation and its effect on global climate; El Niño; the oceans and global warming; Ocean observations by ships, satellites, moorings, floats and more; an introduction to fluid dynamics.

Atmospheric Chemistry

ENG-SCI 133
2018 Spring
Daniel Jacob
Tuesday, Thursday
11:30 am to 12:59 pm

Physical and chemical processes determining the composition of the atmosphere and its implications for climate, ecosystems, and human welfare. Construction of atmospheric composition models. Atmospheric transport. Nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon cycles. Climate forcing by greenhouse gases and aerosols. Stratospheric ozone. Oxidizing power of the atmosphere. Surface air pollution: aerosols and ozone. Deposition to ecosystems: acid rain, nitrogen, mercury.

Energy within Environmental Constraints

ENG-SCI 137
2018 Spring
David Keith
Tuesday, Thursday
8:30 am to 9:59 am

This course provides a systematic introduction to the energy system for students in engineering and applied sciences. Students should gain a working understanding of the some of the most important energy technologies, from prime movers--gas turbines, steam cycles, and reciprocating engines--to secondary energies including fuel production and refining technologies and the electricity transmission and distribution system. The course aims at a systematic understanding of the energy system's environmental footprint as a tool to help students who will work to reduce it. Energy is a commodity. One cannot hope to re-shape the energy system to meet environmental constrains without a rough working understanding of energy markets--costs, prices and elasticities of supply and demand. So the course will integrate engineering economics and other applied social sciences into the treatment of energy technologies to enable a system's view of energy.

Innovation in Science and Engineering: Conference Course

ENG-SCI 139
2017 Fall
David Weitz
Tuesday, Thursday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

Explores factors and conditions contributing to innovation in science and engineering; how important problems are found, defined, and solved; roles of teamwork and creativity; and applications of these methods to other endeavors. Students receive practical and professional training in techniques to define and solve problems, and in brainstorming and other individual and team approaches.

Introduction to Probability with Engineering Applications

ENG-SCI 150
2018 Spring
Yue Lu
Tuesday, Thursday
11:30 am to 12:59 pm

This course introduces students to probability theory and statistics, and their applications to physical, biological and information systems. Topics include: random variables, distributions and densities, conditional expectations, Bayes' rules, laws of large numbers, central limit theorems, Markov chains, Bayesian statistical inferences and parameter estimations. The goal of this course is to prepare students with adequate knowledge of probability theory and statistical methods, which will be useful in the study of several advanced undergraduate/graduate courses and in formulating and solving practical engineering problems.

Applied Electromagnetism

ENG-SCI 151
2018 Spring
Evelyn Hu
Tuesday, Thursday
1:00 pm to 2:29 pm

Electromagnetism and its applications in science and technology. Topics: Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves (e.g., light, microwaves, etc.); wave propagation through media discontinuity; transmission lines, waveguides, and microwave circuits; radiation and antennae; interactions between electromagnetic fields and matters; optics of solids; optical devices; origin of colors; interference and diffraction; lasers and masers; nuclear magnetic resonance and MRI; radio astronomy; wireless networking; plasmonic wave (charge density wave).

Laboratory Electronics

ENG-SCI 153
2017 Fall
Thomas Hayes
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30 pm to 5:29 pm

A lab-intensive introduction to electronic circuit design. Develops circuit intuition and debugging skills through daily hands-on lab exercises, each preceded by class discussion, with minimal use of mathematics and physics. Moves quickly from passive circuits, to discrete transistors, then concentrates on operational amplifiers, used to make a variety of circuits including integrators, oscillators, regulators, and filters. The digital half of the course treats analog-digital interfacing, emphasizes the use of microcontrollers and programmable logic devices (PLDs).

Laboratory Electronics

ENG-SCI 153 001
2018 Spring
Thomas Hayes
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30 pm to 5:29 pm

A lab-intensive introduction to electronic circuit design. Develops circuit intuition and debugging skills through daily hands-on lab exercises, each preceded by class discussion, with minimal use of mathematics and physics. Moves quickly from passive circuits, to discrete transistors, then concentrates on operational amplifiers, used to make a variety of circuits including integrators, oscillators, regulators, and filters. The digital half of the course treats analog-digital interfacing, emphasizes the use of microcontrollers and programmable logic devices (PLDs).

Laboratory Electronics

ENG-SCI 153 002
2018 Spring
Thomas Hayes,
Michael Hegg
Wednesday, Friday
1:30 pm to 5:29 pm

A lab-intensive introduction to electronic circuit design. Develops circuit intuition and debugging skills through daily hands-on lab exercises, each preceded by class discussion, with minimal use of mathematics and physics. Moves quickly from passive circuits, to discrete transistors, then concentrates on operational amplifiers, used to make a variety of circuits including integrators, oscillators, regulators, and filters. The digital half of the course treats analog-digital interfacing, emphasizes the use of microcontrollers and programmable logic devices (PLDs).

Electronic Devices and Circuits

ENG-SCI 154
2017 Fall
Gu-Yeon Wei,
Marco Donato
Monday, Wednesday
1:00 pm to 2:29 pm

Design of electronic analog circuits using semiconductor transistors. Topics include: operational amplifiers and op-amp circuits; time and frequency domain analysis of electric circuits (RC, RL, and RLC); basic semiconductor physics; PN junctions and diodes; bipolar junction transistors (BJT); Field-effect transistors (MOSFETs); bias circuits and current sources; single-ended, differential, single- and multi-stage MOSFET amplifiers; amplifier gain and bandwidth; frequency response, feedback, noise, and stability.

Biological Signal Processing

ENG-SCI 155
2017 Fall
Demba Ba
Tuesday, Thursday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

General properties of common biosignals, Bioelectrical (electrophysiological), Biomechanical, Biomagnetic , and Biochemical signals, Bioelectrical acquisition process. Brief discussion of bio-signals obtained from tomography and inverse imaging. Brief introduction to underlying principles of MRI, Ultrasound, CT-Scan, PET, and SPECT, and their associated signals, inverse imaging, ill-posed problems and regularization. Non-transformed and transformed methods for biosignal processing. Structural and Graphical descriptions. Overview of Fourier transforms, Sine and cosine transform, Wavelet transform, Principle Component Analysis, dimension reduction techniques. Blind Source Separation, Representation models based on the statistical independence of the underlying sources, Independent component analysis (ICA), Dependent component analysis, Independent Subspace separation, Pattern Recognition, neural networks, clustering, and genetics algorithms. Applications to Biosignal Processing, and Human computer interaction.

Signals and Systems

ENG-SCI 156
2018 Spring
Flavio du Pin Calmon
Tuesday, Thursday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

Time and frequency domain representations and analysis of signals and systems. Convolution and linear input-output systems in continuous and discrete time. Fourier transforms and Fourier series for continuous- and discrete-time signals. Laplace and Z transforms. Analog and digital filtering. Modulation. Sampling. FFT. Applications in circuit analysis, communication, control, and computing.

Feedback Control Systems: Analysis and Design

ENG-SCI 158
2017 Fall
Na Li
Tuesday, Thursday
11:30 am to 12:59 pm

This course provides an introduction to feedback and control in physical, biological, engineering, information, financial, and social sciences. The focus is on the basic principles of feedback and its use as a tool for inferring and/or altering the dynamics of systems under uncertainty. Key themes throughout the course will include linear system analysis, state/output feedback, frequency response, reference tracking, PID controller, dynamic programming, and limit of performance. This includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic.

Pollution Control in Aquatic Ecosystems

ENG-SCI 163
2017 Fall
Patrick Ulrich
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
10:00 am to 10:59 am

This course is focused on aspects of environmental engineering related to the fate, transport, and control of pollution in surface water ecosystems. Course modules will cover ecological impacts of environmental contaminants; surface water aspects of engineering hydrology, including rainfall-runoff relationships; quantitative models of pollutant fate and transport in rivers, lakes, and wetlands; best management practices for the prevention and control of aquatic pollution; and sustainable natural treatment systems for water quality improvement.
 

Water Engineering

ENG-SCI 165
2017 Fall
Chad Vecitis
Tuesday, Thursday
11:30 am to 12:59 pm

Introduces the fundamentals of water biology, chemistry, physics and transport processes needed to understand water quality and water purification technologies. Practical instruction in basic water analyses concluding with a final water treatment project in place of exam.

State-of-the-art Instrumentation in Environmental Sciences

ENG-SCI 166
2018 Spring
Frank Keutsch
Monday, Wednesday
11:30 am to 12:59 pm

This course will showcase how novel technologies have allowed fascinating new insights into key aspects of our environment. The development of novel instrumentation, driven by technological advances, is revolutionizing the environmental sciences. The new instruments are transforming observations in many ways. For example, they introduce new observables and extend the spatial and temporal coverage and resolution of (Earth) observations. The observations are advancing our understanding of environmental science topics that are of high societal relevance (e.g., climate change and air pollution). This course will highlight how state-of-the-art instrument design has enabled these fascinating advances by focusing on the physics, chemistry, and engineering principals that are central to this success. The course will also focus on the special requirements for these instruments (e.g., ruggedness and robotic operation) resulting from their deployment in the environment on a variety of observational platforms. In addition, the course will discuss challenges associated with determination of accuracy of instruments that are inaccessible after deployment (e.g., on satellites or oceanic probes).

Seminar on Global Pollution Issues: Case Study of Lead Biogeochemistry

ENG-SCI 169
2017 Fall
Elsie Sunderland
Tuesday
1:00 pm to 3:59 pm

This course provides a cross-disciplinary overview of environmental science and how research contributes to public policy and human health risk assessment through a case study of a global pollution issue: lead biogeochemistry. The scientific foundations of environmental research methods are discussed (i.e., analytical chemistry, ecology, use of environmental archives, environmental modeling). Experience conducting multidisciplinary environmental research and data analysis will be provided. Course Activities: Lectures, discussions, case studies, field/lab visits.

Introduction to Electronic and Photonic Devices

ENG-SCI 173
2017 Fall
Evelyn Hu
Tuesday, Thursday
1:00 pm to 2:29 pm

This course will focus on physical principles underlying semiconductor devices: electrons and holes in semiconductors , energies and bandgaps, transport properties of electrons and holes, p-n junctions, transistors, light emitting diodes, lasers, solar cells and thermoelectric devices.

Introduction to MicroElectroMechanical System

ENG-SCI 176
2017 Fall
Fawwaz Habbal,
Amit Solanki,
Anas Chalah
Thursday
4:00 pm to 5:59 pm

This course introduces student to the rapidly emerging, multi-disciplinary and exciting field of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). It teaches fundamentals of micro machining and Micro fabrication techniques, including planar thin-film process technologies, photolithography and soft-lithography techniques, deposition and etching techniques, and surface, bulk, and electroplating micro machining technologies.

Microfabrication Laboratory

ENG-SCI 177
2018 Spring
Marko Loncar
Monday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

Introduction to micro- and nanofabrication processes used for photonic and electronic devices. Students use both an instructional lab as well as a state-of-the-art cleanroom in the Center for Nanoscale Systems.  Several electronic and photonic devices will be fabricated, such as transistors, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers.  Lectures will focus on fabrication processes, including lithography, deposition of metals and dielectrics, etching, oxidation, implantation and diffusion of dopants, and device characterization.

Engineering Thermodynamics

ENG-SCI 181
2017 Fall
Michael Aziz
Tuesday, Thursday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

Introduction to classical engineering thermodynamics. Topics: Zeroth Law and temperature. Properties of single-component gases, liquids, and solids. Equations of state for ideal and simple nonideal substances. First Law, heat and heat transfer, work, internal energy, enthalpy. Second Law, Third Law, entropy, free energy, exergy. Heat engines and important engineering applications such as refrigerators, power cycles. Properties and simple models of solutions. Phase and chemical equilibrium in multicomponent systems; chemical potential. Electrochemistry, batteries, fuel cells. Laboratory included.

Introduction to Heat Transfer

ENG-SCI 183
2018 Spring
David Clarke
Tuesday, Thursday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

The macroscopic description of the fundamentals of heat transfer and applications to practical problems in energy conversion, electronics and living systems with an emphasis on developing a physical and analytical understanding of conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer. Emphasis will also be given to problem solving skills based on applying governing principles, mathematical models and physical intuition. Includes laboratory sessions and semester-long projects.

Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering

ENG-SCI 190
2017 Fall
Xin Li
Monday, Wednesday
11:30 am to 12:59 pm

Introduction to the structure, properties, and applications of materials. Crystal structure and defects. Phase transformations: phase diagrams, diffusion, nucleation and growth. Mechanisms of deformation and fracture. Effect of microstructure on properties. Examples from a variety of engineering applications.

Decision Theory

ENG-SCI 201
2018 Spring
Demba Ba
Tuesday, Thursday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

Mathematical analysis of decision making. Bayesian inference and risk. Maximum likelihood and nonparametric methods. Algorithmic methods for decision rules: perceptrons, neural nets, and back propagation. Hidden Markov models, Blum-Welch, principal and independent components.

Fluid Dynamics

ENG-SCI 220
2017 Fall
James Rice
Monday, Wednesday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

Continuum mechanics; conservation of mass and momentum, energy; stress, kinematics, and constitutive equations; vector and tensor calculus. Dimensional analysis and scaling. Navier-Stokes equations, Reynolds number. Solutions for simple flow states. Low Reynolds number flows; porous media flows; lubrication theory; gravity currents. Inviscid flows, Kelvin circulation theorem, Bernoulli integrals, Vortical flows. Waves in fluids; acoustics, shocks, water waves. Airfoil theory. Boundary layers. Flow instabilities. Mixing, and turbulence in unbounded and bounded flows.

Drug Delivery

ENG-SCI 221
2018 Spring
Samir Mitragotri
Monday, Wednesday
1:00 pm to 2:29 pm

Methods to deliver molecules to the human body. Physiological obstacles and engineering solutions. Characterization techniques for drug delivery synthesis and in vitro analysis. Case studies of current pharmaceutical products.

Advanced Cellular Engineering

ENG-SCI 222
2017 Fall
Neel Joshi
Tuesday, Thursday
11:30 am to 12:59 pm

This is a combined introductory graduate/upper-level undergraduate course that focuses on examining modern techniques for manipulating cellular behavior and the application of these techniques to problems in the biomedical and biotechnological arenas. Topics will include expanding the genetic code, genetic circuits, rewiring signaling pathways, controlling behavior through cell-matrix interactions, and directed differentiation of stem cells. Lectures will review fundamental concepts in cell biology before delving into topical examples from current literature. Students will work individually and in teams to determine the boundaries of existing cellular engineering techniques using scientific literature and propose original research to address unmet technological needs.

Medical Device Design

ENG-SCI 227
2018 Spring
Conor Walsh
Monday, Wednesday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

Project-based course on the design of medical devices to address needs identified by hospital-based clinicians. Students work in teams with physicians to develop a novel device. The design process includes: needs finding; problem identification; prior art searches; strategy and concept generation; estimation; sketching; sketch modeling; machine elements, ergonomics and prototyping.

Survey of Energy Technology

ENG-SCI 229
2018 Spring
Michael Aziz
Wednesday, Friday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

Principles governing energy generation and interconversion. Current and projected world energy use. Selected important current and anticipated future technologies for energy generation, interconversion, storage, and end usage.

Energy Technology

ENG-SCI 231
2018 Spring
Michael Aziz
Wednesday, Friday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

Principles governing energy generation and interconversion. Current and projected world energy use. Selected important current and anticipated future technologies for energy generation, interconversion, storage, and end usage.

Integrative Frameworks for Technology, Environment, and Society I

ENG-SCI 236A
2017 Fall
Woodward Yang
Thursday
4:00 pm to 5:59 pm
Tuesday
4:00 pm to 4:59 pm

Developing and implementing good solutions to real problems facing human society requires a broad understanding of the relationships between technology innovation, science, manufacturing, design thinking, environment, sustainability, culture, aesthetics, business, public policy, and government. Various frameworks for understanding these complex relationships within the context of real-world problems will be explored and discussed.  Coursework will be based on assigned readings, case studies, research assignments, exercises, and class discussions.

Integrative Frameworks for Technology, Environment, and Society II

ENG-SCI 236B
2018 Spring
Woodward Yang
Tuesday
4:00 pm to 4:59 pm
Thursday
4:00 pm to 5:59 pm

Developing and implementing good solutions to real problems facing human society requires a broad understanding of the relationships between technology innovation, science, manufacturing, design thinking, environment, sustainability, culture, aesthetics, business, public policy, and government. Various frameworks for understanding these complex relationships within the context of real-world problems will be explored and discussed.  Coursework will be based on assigned readings, case studies, research assignments, exercises, and class discussions.

Planetary Radiation and Climate

ENG-SCI 237
2018 Spring
Robin Wordsworth
Tuesday, Thursday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

Atmospheric radiative transfer, including stellar properties, spectroscopy, gray and real gas calculations, Mie theory and scattering, satellite retrievals, and radiative-convective climate modelling. Climate feedbacks: the runaway greenhouse, volatile cycles on Mars and Titan, and atmospheric collapse around M-stars. Atmospheric evolution and escape (Jeans, diffusion-limited, hydrodynamic), and key processes in planetary atmospheric chemistry.

Advanced Innovation in Science and Engineering: Conference Course

ENG-SCI 239
2017 Fall
David Weitz
Tuesday, Thursday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

Students are expected to meet all the requirements of Engineering Sciences 139 and in addition are required to prepare an individual term project with significant analytic emphasis in an area of scientific or technological innovation.

Solid Mechanics

ENG-SCI 240
2017 Fall
Joost Vlassak
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
10:00 am to 10:59 am

Foundations of solid mechanics, development of elasticity theory, and introduction to  linear visco-elasticity and plasticity. Basic elasticity solutions. Variational principles. Deformation of plates. Introduction to large deformation.

Advanced Elasticity

ENG-SCI 241
2017 Fall
Zhigang Suo
Tuesday, Thursday
2:30 pm to 4:00 pm

Finite deformation; instabilities; thermodynamics; thermoelasticity; poroelasticity; electroactive polymers, hydrogels, polyelectrolyte gels

Advanced Neural Control of Movement

ENG-SCI 249
2018 Spring
Maurice Smith
Tuesday, Thursday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

Students expected to meet all of the requirements of Biomedical Engineering 130 (formerly Engineering Sciences 149) and in addition to submit a term project with significant analytic content.

Information Theory

ENG-SCI 250
2017 Fall
Flavio du Pin Calmon
Tuesday, Thursday
1:00 pm to 2:29 pm

Fundamental concepts of information theory, Entropy, Kullback-Leibler divergence, Mutual information; typical sequences and their applications, Loss-less data compression, Huffman codes, Elias Codes, Arithmetic Codes, Discrete Memory-less Channels, Channel Coding and Capacity, Differential Entropy, Gaussian Channels, rate distortion theory, Multi-user Information Theory, Connections between information theory and statistics.

Statistical Inference with Engineering Applications

ENG-SCI 255
2017 Fall
Yue Lu
Monday, Wednesday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

Statistical signal processing; detection and estimation; hypothesis testing; linear and non-linear estimation; maximum likelihood and Bayes approaches; graphical models and message passing algorithms; large deviation analysis and asymptotic methods in statistics; high-dimensional probability theory; stochastic processes and systems; Wiener and Kalman filtering; Markov chain Monte-Carlo methods; applications to physical, chemical, biological and information systems.

Chemical Reactions and Mechanisms in the Environment

ENG-SCI 263
2017 Fall
Frank Keutsch
Tuesday, Thursday
8:30 am to 9:59 am

In this course a framework of tropospheric chemistry will be generated that requires no previous knowledge of this topic. The goal is to develop an understanding of chemical and physical processes in the troposphere. Focus is on the main processes transforming emissions into the secondary pollutants that affect the environment, human health, and climate, in particular with respect to the role of anthropogenic influence. This will provide a foundation for the evaluation of the impact the newest scientific studies have on our understanding of processes that are important for the part of the atmosphere we live in.

Advanced Water Treatment

ENG-SCI 265
2018 Spring
Chad Vecitis
Monday
1:00 pm to 2:59 pm

Advanced Water Treatment will give students detailed instruction in emerging technologies for municipal wastewater treatment, industrial wastewater treatment, wastewater reclamation and reuse, desalination, and groundwater remediation. The course will begin by introducing wastewater quality, effluent water quality endpoints, and conventional treatment methodologies. The theoretical focus of the course will be on the fundamental biology, chemistry, and physics of processes including nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, membrane bioreactors, denitrification and phosphate removal, ozonolysis, UV photolysis, photocatalysis, and sonolysis. We will also discuss wastewater-to-energy processes including microbial fuel cells, anaerobic digestion, and electrochemical waste-to-hydrogen.

Environmental Nanotechnology

ENG-SCI 269
2018 Spring
Chad Vecitis
Monday, Wednesday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

Introduces students to the environmental aspects of nanoscience and nanotechnology. We will study the fundamental physical chemical properties, characterization, environmental implications, and environmental applications of nanoparticles and nanomaterials. Case studies from recent publications on engineered carbon nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene will be discussed.

Optics and Photonics

ENG-SCI 273
2017 Fall
Federico Capasso
Wednesday, Friday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

The focus is on the foundations of optics/photonics and on some of its most important modern developments and applications. Powerful and widely used computational tools will be developed in the sections. Topics to be covered: Maxwell's equations, Free space optics. Reflection, refraction, polarization (Jones Calculus and Stokes parameters); interference and diffraction. Light-matter interaction, dispersion and absorption. Guided wave optics (including optical fibers). Perturbation and couple mode theory, transfer matrix methods; numerical methods. Optical resonators.  Photonic crystals. Near-field optics. Metal optics and Plasmonics. Metamaterials and Metasurfaces.

Quantum Devices

ENG-SCI 274
2017 Fall
Marko Loncar
Wednesday, Friday
10:30 am to 11:59 am

Electronic structure of crystals. Semiconductor heterostructures: bandstructure engineering. Low-dimensional solids: quantum wells, wires and dots; superlattices; 2D electron gas; carbon nanotubes, nanowires, graphene. Tunneling and resonant tunneling, superlattice transport. Quantum point contacts. Interband and intersubband optical transistions. Quantum confined Stark effect. Device concepts (diodes, transistors, lasers). Quantum well lasers, modulators and detectors. Resonant tunneling devices. Quantum cascade lasers.

Introduction to MicroElectroMechanical System

ENG-SCI 276
2017 Fall
Peter Stark
Monday
8:30 am to 10:59 am

In this course, the student is introduced to micro-fabrication techniques through the filter of the rapidly emerging, multi-disciplinary and exciting field of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS.) It is a lab based course complemented by mandatory weekly lectures.  It teaches fundamentals of micro machining and fabrication techniques, including planar thin-film process technologies, photolithography and soft-lithography techniques, deposition and etching techniques as well as limited inspection and characterization technologies. Students, in teams, will build and characterize fully functional: surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators, micro polymerized chain reaction (uPCR) amplifiers, micro pressure sensors and final projects of their own choosing.  In doing so, they will be exposed to the basic principles of tools in an advanced cleanroom.

Microfabrication Laboratory

ENG-SCI 277
2018 Spring
Marko Loncar
Monday
10:00 am to 11:29 am

Content and requirements are similar to Engineering Sciences 177, with the addition that students enrolled in Engineering Sciences 277 are given an additional project.

Nano Micro Macro: Adaptive Material Laboratory

ENG-SCI 291
2017 Fall
Joanna Aizenberg,
Salmaan Craig
Wednesday
8:30 am to 11:29 am

This course explores research methods and techniques through the analyses of emerging energy-efficient materials and systems and their applications in buildings. It serves as an interdisciplinary platform for engineers, materials and computer scientists to interact with the design students and develop new products. The course introduces ideas-to-innovation processes in a hands-on, project/product focused manner that balance engineering concepts with promising, real-world opportunities. Switching back and forth between guided discovery and focused development, between bottom-up and top-down thinking, and market analyses, the course helps students establish generalizable frameworks as researchers and innovators with a focus on new and emerging technologies.

Cryo-Electron Microscopy for Biological and Soft Materials Lecture/Lab

ENG-SCI 293
2017 Fall
David Bell
Monday
2:30 pm to 3:59 pm

This class covers the fundamental principles underlying cryo-electron microscopy applied to Biological and SoftMaterials starting with the basic anatomy of electron microscopes, an introduction to Fourier transforms, and the principles of image formation. Building upon that foundation, the class then covers the sample preparation issues, data collection strategies, and basic image processing workflows.

Quantum Materials and Devices Seminar Series

ENG-SCI 294HFRA
2017 Fall
Robert Westervelt
Thursday
4:00 pm to 4:59 pm

The Science & Technology Center for Integrated Quantum Materials (Harvard, Howard Univ, and MIT) creates electronics and photonics from Quantum Materials: Atomic Layers (graphene, boron nitride, transition-metal dichalcoginides) for atomic-scale devices, Topological Insulators for corruption-free data channels, and Nitrogen Vacancy Centers in Diamond for single-atom memory. Experts in the field will present seminars about their research.

Quantum Materials and Devices Seminar Series

ENG-SCI 294HFRB
2018 Spring
Robert Westervelt
Thursday
4:00 pm to 4:59 pm

The Science & Technology Center for Integrated Quantum Materials (Harvard, Howard Univ, and MIT) creates electronics and photonics from Quantum Materials: Atomic Layers (graphene, boron nitride, transition-metal dichalcoginides) for atomic-scale devices, Topological Insulators for corruption-free data channels, and Nitrogen Vacancy Centers in Diamond for single-atom memory. Experts in the field will present seminars about their research.

Special Topics in Engineering Sciences

ENG-SCI 299R
2017 Fall
Fawwaz Habbal

Supervision of experimental or theoretical research on acceptable engineering and applied science problems and supervision of reading on topics not covered by regular courses of instruction.

Special Topics in Engineering Sciences

ENG-SCI 299R
2018 Spring
Fawwaz Habbal

Supervision of experimental or theoretical research on acceptable engineering and applied science problems and supervision of reading on topics not covered by regular courses of instruction.