Environmental Science and Engineering Courses

For more information on specific courses, including prerequisites, registration details and any last-minute changes, visit my.harvard

Introduction to Environmental Science and Engineering

ESE 6
2019 Spring
Patrick Ulrich
Tuesday, Thursday
10:30am to 11:45am

This course will provide students with an introduction to current topics in environmental science and engineering by providing: an overview of current environmental issues, critically evaluating their underlying science and knowledge limitations, and exploring the best-available engineering solutions to some of our most pressing environmental problems. The course will emphasize the interconnected biological, geological, and chemical cycles of the earth system (biogeochemical cycles) and how human activity affects these natural cycles within each of the major environmental compartments (atmospheric, aquatic, and terrestrial).

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Earth Resources and the Environment

ESE 109
2019 Spring
John Shaw,
Annika Quick
Tuesday, Thursday
09:00am to 10:15am

An overview of the Earth's energy and material resources, including conventional and unconventional hydrocarbons, nuclear fuels, alternative/renewable energy resources, metals, and other industrial materials. The course emphasizes the geologic and environmental factors that dictate the availability of these resources, the methods used to identify and exploit them, and the environmental impacts of these operations. Topics include: coal and acid rain; petroleum exploration, drilling, and production, shale gas/oil, photochemical smog, and oil spills; nuclear power and radioactive hazards; alternative energies (solar, hydroelectric, tidal, geothermal power), metals and mining.

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Introduction to Meteorology and Climate

ESE 132
2018 Fall
Dr Brian Farrell
Tuesday, Thursday
10:30am to 11:45am

Physical concepts necessary to understand atmospheric structure and motion. Phenomena studied include the formation of clouds and precipitation, solar and terrestrial radiation, dynamical balance of the large-scale wind, and the origin of cyclones. Concepts developed for understanding today's atmosphere are applied to understanding the record of past climate change and the prospects for climate change in the future.

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Atmospheric Chemistry

ESE 133
2019 Spring
Daniel Jacob,
Steven Wofsy
Tuesday, Thursday
12:00pm to 01:15pm

Physical and chemical processes determining the composition of the atmosphere and its implications for climate, ecosystems, and human welfare. Construction of atmospheric composition models. Atmospheric transport. Nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon cycles. Climate forcing by greenhouse gases and aerosols. Stratospheric ozone. Oxidizing power of the atmosphere. Surface air pollution: aerosols and ozone. Deposition to ecosystems: acid rain, nitrogen, mercury.

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Climate and Climate Engineeering

ESE 136
2019 Spring
David Keith
Tuesday, Thursday
01:30pm to 02:45pm

An introduction to the physics that determine our planet’s climate motivated by concerns about human-driven climate change. From highly-simplified models of radiation and convection in a column to state-of-the art models of the general circulation, the course provides a hands-on introduction to modeling tools as a basis for understanding predictions of climate change and assessing their uncertainty. Solar geoengineering, the possibility of deliberate large-scale intervention in the climate, is covered as a potentially important new application of atmospheric science and as a tool to motivate analysis of aerosol radiative forcing, feedbacks, and uncertainty.

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Space Science and Engineering: Theory and Applications

ESE 160
2018 Fall
Robin Wordsworth
Monday, Wednesday
10:30am to 11:45am

This course is an introduction to the challenges involved in designing spacecraft for observation of Earth and exploration of other planets. Topics covered include basic atmospheric and planetary science, key principles of remote sensing, telemetry, orbital transfer theory, propulsion and launch system design, and thermal and power management.

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Hydrology

ESE 162
2018 Fall
Kaighin McColl
Monday, Wednesday
09:00am to 10:15am

This course provides an introduction to the global hydrologic cycle and relevant terrestrial and atmospheric processes. It covers the concepts of water and energy balance; atmospheric radiation, composition and circulation; precipitation formation; evaporation; vegetation transpiration; infiltration, storm runoff, and flood processes; groundwater flow and unsaturated zone processes; and snow processes.

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Pollution Control in Aquatic Ecosystems

ESE 163
2018 Fall
Patrick Ulrich
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
01:30pm to 02:45pm

This course is focused on aspects of environmental engineering related to the fate, transport, and control of pollution in surface water ecosystems. Course modules will cover ecological impacts of environmental contaminants; surface water aspects of engineering hydrology, including rainfall-runoff relationships; quantitative models of pollutant fate and transport in rivers, lakes, and wetlands; best management practices for the prevention and control of aquatic pollution; and sustainable natural treatment systems for water quality improvement.
 

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State-of-the-art Instrumentation in Environmental Sciences

ESE 166
2019 Spring
Frank Keutsch
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
09:00am to 10:15am

This course will showcase how novel technologies have allowed fascinating new insights into key aspects of our environment. The development of novel instrumentation, driven by technological advances, is revolutionizing the environmental sciences. The new instruments are transforming observations in many ways. For example, they introduce new observables and extend the spatial and temporal coverage and resolution of (Earth) observations. The observations are advancing our understanding of environmental science topics that are of high societal relevance (e.g., climate change and air pollution). This course will highlight how state-of-the-art instrument design has enabled these fascinating advances by focusing on the physics, chemistry, and engineering principals that are central to this success. The course will also focus on the special requirements for these instruments (e.g., ruggedness and robotic operation) resulting from their deployment in the environment on a variety of observational platforms. In addition, the course will discuss challenges associated with determination of accuracy of instruments that are inaccessible after deployment (e.g., on satellites or oceanic probes).

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