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Resources

We are committed to not only being a resource for the SEAS community but also connecting our students, faculty, staff, and postdoctoral researchers to available resources at Harvard University. Please refer to the links below to learn more about the resources across campus related to diversity, inclusion, and belonging.​​​​​​ We are also including resources to learn about structural inequality and addressing systems of oppression.

Learning Resources

Books

  1. Algorithms of Oppression by Safiya Noble*
  2. Black, Brown, Bruised: How Racialized STEM Education Stifles Innovation**
  3. Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower by Dr. Brittney Cooper
  4. Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson
  5. Me and White Supremacy by Layla F Saad*
  6. Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire*
  7. Race After Technology: Abolitionist Tools for the New Jim Code
  8. So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo*
  9. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison*
  10. The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein*
  11. The Condemnation of Blackness:Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America by Khalil Muhammad*
  12. The Evidence of Things Not Seen by James Baldwin
  13. The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander*
  14. The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges are failing disadvantaged students by Anthony Abraham Jack**
  15. Too Much Schooling, Too Little Education: A Paradox of Black Life in White Societies by Mwalimu Shujaa*
  16. White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo*
  17. White Rage by Carol Anderson*
  18. Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? by Beverly Daniel Tatum*
  19. Women, Race, and Class by Angela Davis*

*eBook available through Harvard Library

**SEAS Community Read

Journal Articles

  1. McGee, E. (2018). “Black Genius, Asian Fail”: The Detriment of Stereotype Lift and Stereotype Threat in High-Achieving Asian and Black STEM Students. AERA Open, 4(4), 1-16.
  2. Obermeyer, Ziad, Powers, Brian, Vogeli, Christine, & Mullainathan, Sendhil. (2019). Dissecting racial bias in an algorithm used to manage the health of populations. Science (American Association for the Advancement of Science), 366(6464), 447-453.
  3. Robinson, William H, McGee, Ebony O, Bentley, Lydia C, Houston, Stacey L, & Botchway, Portia K. (2016). Addressing Negative Racial and Gendered Experiences That Discourage Academic Careers in Engineering. Computing in Science & Engineering, 18(2), 29-39.
  4. Cech, E A, & Waidzunas, T J. (2021). Systemic inequalities for LGBTQ professionals in STEM. Science Advances, 7(3), Science advances, 2021-01, Vol.7 (3).
  5. Freeman, Jonathan B. (2020). Measuring and Resolving LGBTQ Disparities in STEM. Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 7(2), 141-148.

Documentaries & Movies

  1. 13th
  2. I Am Not Your Negro
  3. Just Mercy
  4. Fruitvale Station
  5. Selma
  6. When They See Us
  7. Coded Bias
  8. Picture a Scientist

Additional Resources

  1. Resources | 500 Queer Scientists
  2. LGBT Community and STEM Diversity | The Brink
  3. LGBT in STEM: Progress but still many obstacles
  4. ‘Now I know I’m not alone.’ Study highlights challenges LGBTQ workers in STEM face