Planning & Advising

Electrical Engineering Advising

Currently enrolled Harvard College students are encouraged to explore their potential interests in Electrical Engineering by meeting with Christopher Lombardo (Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies, Electrical and Mechanical Engineering).

After entering the concentration, all EE students are assigned two formal advisers to support the development of their academic and professional goals: a Concentration Adviser (Christopher Lombardo, ADUS for EE) and a Faculty Adviser (a professor from the EE Board of Advisers).

 

Sample 2-Year Schedule for Electrical Engineering

The sample schedules below are provided as an example of a typical first two-years for a preconcentrator interested in EE.  These samples provide one specific example of a course progression; however, students may decide on an alternate path. We strongly recommend that students interested in engineering begin taking mathematics in their first semester and plan to complete their math, chemistry, and physics requirements within the first two years.  Leading up to an EE declaration during the sophomore year, students will work with a concentration adviser to construct an individual degree program that matches their specific interests within EE while simultaneously fulfilling all of the concentration requirements.

 

Sample 2-Year Schedule for Electrical Engineering students in Math Ma

Fall 1st Year

Math Ma - Intro to Functions and Calculus I

ES50 - Intro to Electrical Engineering

Spring 1st Year

Math Mb - Intro to Functions and Calculus II

ES 52 - The Joy of Electronics

*PS 12a - Physics: Mechanics

Fall 2nd Year

Math 1b - Calculus, Series, & Diff Equations

*PS 12b - Physics: Electromagnetism

CS 50 - Intro to Computer Science

Spring 2nd Year

Math 21a – Multivariable Calculus

*PS 11 - Modern Chemistry (for S.B. students)

Engineering Elective

Sophomore Forum (non-credit)

 

*Students starting in Math Ma/1a who are less comfortable with mathematics can take PS 11 (Modern Chemistry) (for S.B. students) in Spring 1st year, AP 50a or Physics 15a (both courses cover Physics: Mechanics) in Fall 2nd year, and AP 50b or Physics 15b (both courses cover Physics: Electromagnetism) in Spring 2nd year.

 

Sample 2-Year Schedule for Electrical Engineering students in Math 1a

Fall 1st Year

Math 1a - Intro to Calculus

ES50 - Intro to Electrical Engineering

Spring 1st Year

Math 1b - Calculus, Series, & Diff Eq

ES52 - The Joy of Electronics

PS11 - Modern Chemistry (for SB students)

Fall 2nd Year

AM21a - Math Methods In Sciences

AP50a - Mechanics

CS50 - Intro to Computer Science

Spring 2nd Year

AM21b - Math Methods In Sciences

AP50b - Electromagnetism

Engineering Elective

Sophomore Forum (non-credit)

 

Sample 2 Year Schedule for Electrical Engineering students in Math 21a

Fall 1st Year

AM21a - Math Methods In Sciences

ES50 - Intro to Electrical Engineering

Spring 1st Year

AM21b - Math Methods In Sciences

ES52 - The Joy of Electronics

PS12a - Mechanics

Fall 2nd Year

CS50 - Intro to Computer Science

PS12b - Electromagnetism

ES154 - Electronic Devices & Circuits

Spring 2nd Year

ES156 - Signals & Systems

Applied Math or EE Elective

PS11 - Modern Chemistry (for SB students)

Sophomore Forum (non-credit)

Upper-Level EE Courses

Once EE students have established a foundation in the prerequisite math and science courses, they can take many exciting upper-level electives. While these courses are typically taken in the junior and senior years, some students with advanced preparation in math and science begin taking the 100-level courses during their sophomore year.  Some example upper-level EE courses include:

○      ES 173: Intro to Electronic and Photonic Devices - This course focuses on physical principles underlying semiconductor devices: electrons and holes in semiconductors, energies and bandgaps, transport properties of electrons and holes, p-n junctions, transistors, light emitting diodes, lasers, solar cells and thermoelectric devices.

○      CS 141: Computing Hardware - Introduction to the design, structure, and operation of digital computers; logic circuits and digital electronics; computer arithmetic; computer architecture; and machine language programming.

○      ES 156: Signals and Systems - Time and frequency domain representations and analysis of signals and systems. Convolution and linear input-output systems in continuous and discrete time. Fourier transforms and Fourier series for continuous- and discrete-time signals. Laplace and Z transforms. Analog and digital filtering. Modulation. Sampling. FFT. Applications in circuit analysis, communication, control, and computing.