Topics Summer 2010

Uncovering Open Access

Open access seeks, through the power of the Internet, to make scholarly materials freely available to the world.  No passwords.  No subscription fees. And today, it is perhaps the hottest flashpoint in science publication--with Harvard, and an unlikely firebrand named Stuart Shieber '81, right in the thick of things. [Read More]

Stuart Shieber: Natural Language Liberator

Like the old Apple computer slogan, Stuart Shieber could be described as a “think different” kind of computer scientist. An expert in language processing (human, programming, graphical, and the dynamic intersections among all three), he weaves together AI and algorithms with anthropology and psychology to uncover how communication works. [Read More]

The DASH Repository

Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard, or DASH (http://dash.harvard.edu/), is a central open-access repository for the scholarly output of faculty and the broader Harvard research community. DASH relies upon DSpace, open-source software designed specifically for digital content archiving. DASH is, in part, the byproduct of the Compact for Open-Access Publishing Equity. [Read More]

Building a Better e-Book

Open-access scholarship is first and foremost about ensuring access. But the entire concept grew out of a gradual conversion of print to online formats. The continuing evolution in the ways that we access information will also influence future economic and publishing models — and vice versa. [Read More]

Q&A with Scribd’s Trip Adler ’06

John R. "Trip" Adler III ’06 (Physics) broke tradition but still ended up on top. The Harvard entrepreneur actually stuck it out long enough to earn his sheepskin before launching the start-up Scribd. Through the online-publishing, social-networking site (www.scribd.com). [Read More]

References and Additional Reading

Givler, Peter. “University Press Publishing in the United States,” in Scholarly Publishing: Books, Journals, Publishers and Libraries in the Twentieth Century. Edited by Richard E. Abel and Lyman W. Newman. Wiley, 2002:107−20. See also, Association of American University Presses website, www.aaupnet.org/resources/upusa.html.

Harnad, Stevan S. “The Green Road to Open Access: A Leveraged Transition,” in The Culture of Periodicals from the Perspective of the Electronic Age. Edited by Anna Gacs. L'Harmattan, 2007: 99−106.

Harnad, Stevan S. “Open-Access Archivangelism,” a blog, http://openaccess.eprints.org/.

Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) podcast interview with Robert Darnton regarding Harvard's Open-Access Mandates, www.jisc.ac.uk/news/stories/2009/10/podcast91robertdarnton.aspx.

Office for Scholarly Communication, https://osc.hul.harvard.edu/

Palfrey, John. “Reorganizing the Harvard Law School Library,” posted on Et. Seq.: The Harvard Law School Library Blog (Aug. 10, 2009), http://etseq.law.harvard.edu/index.php/site/reorganizing_the_harvard_law_school_library/.

Shieber, Stuart M. “Equity for open-access journal publishing,” PLoS Biology 7(8): e1000165. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000165, www.plosbiology.org/article/info:doi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pbio.1000165.

Shieber, Stuart M. “The Occasional Pamphlet,” a blog, http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/pamphlet/.

Suber, Peter. “SPARC Open Access Newsletter,” a monthly newsletter published by the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/archive.htm.

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