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Courses

Course Listing

For a snapshot of courses being offered by Harvard School of Engineering over the next four years, visit our multi-year course planning tool.

 

Physics as a Foundation for Science and Engineering, Part I

APPHY 50A
2021 Fall

Eric Mazur
Tuesday, Thursday
9:00am to 10:15am

AP 50A is the first half of a one-year, team- and project-based introduction to physics focusing on the application of physics to real-world problems. The course is designed specifically for engineering and physics majors and is equivalent in content and rigor to a standard calculus-based introductory physics course. Besides mastering course content and developing scientific reasoning and problem-solving skills, the course goals include strengthening self-directed learning and developing collaborative skills. The course involves synchronous and asynchronous class activities and project work. It is designed to provide maximum flexibility: You can complete the asynchronous activities at your convenience; for the synchronous class activities you have a choice of timing (Tu/Th 9 am or 1:30 pm) and modality (in person/online) and you can switch timing and modality during the semester; see the course Canvas site for details. Regardless of the modality you choose for the synchronous class activities, the project work and the project fairs are in person and the project fairs will take place during the regularly scheduled class periods.

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Physics as a Foundation for Science and Engineering, Part I

APPHY 50A
2021 Fall

Eric Mazur
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

AP 50A is the first half of a one-year, team- and project-based introduction to physics focusing on the application of physics to real-world problems. The course is designed specifically for engineering and physics majors and is equivalent in content and rigor to a standard calculus-based introductory physics course. Besides mastering course content and developing scientific reasoning and problem-solving skills, the course goals include strengthening self-directed learning and developing collaborative skills. The course involves synchronous and asynchronous class activities and project work. It is designed to provide maximum flexibility: You can complete the asynchronous activities at your convenience; for the synchronous class activities you have a choice of timing (Tu/Th 9 am or 1:30 pm) and modality (in person/online) and you can switch timing and modality during the semester; see the course Canvas site for details. Regardless of the modality you choose for the synchronous class activities, the project work and the project fairs are in person and the project fairs will take place during the regularly scheduled class periods.

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Physics as a Foundation for Science and Engineering, Part II

APPHY 50B
2022 Spring

Eric Mazur
Tuesday, Thursday
9:00am to 10:15am

AP 50B is the second half of a one-year, calculus-based introduction to physics focusing on the application of physics to real-world problems to teach scientific reasoning and problem-solving skills. The course is designed specifically for engineering and physics majors and is equivalent in content and rigor to a standard calculus-based introductory physics course. You will work in teams on three, month-long projects, each culminating in a project fair. Projects will involve a combination of construction of simple devices and circuits from kits provided to you, measurements taken in and around the home, and simulations. Besides mastering course content, such as electrostatics, electric current, magnetostatics, electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic radiation, and geometric and wave optics, the course goals include self-directed learning and collaborative skills. In the online version of this course, you will carry out many activities asynchronously at your own convenience. Most of the face-to-face time with the staff (Tu/Th 9:00 am or 4:30 pm) will be spent to address specific difficulties and individual needs of the various teams.

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Physics as a Foundation for Science and Engineering, Part II

APPHY 50B
2022 Spring

Eric Mazur
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

AP 50B is the second half of a one-year, calculus-based introduction to physics focusing on the application of physics to real-world problems to teach scientific reasoning and problem-solving skills. The course is designed specifically for engineering and physics majors and is equivalent in content and rigor to a standard calculus-based introductory physics course. You will work in teams on three, month-long projects, each culminating in a project fair. Projects will involve a combination of construction of simple devices and circuits from kits provided to you, measurements taken in and around the home, and simulations. Besides mastering course content, such as electrostatics, electric current, magnetostatics, electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic radiation, and geometric and wave optics, the course goals include self-directed learning and collaborative skills. In the online version of this course, you will carry out many activities asynchronously at your own convenience. Most of the face-to-face time with the staff (Tu/Th 9:00 am or 4:30 pm) will be spent to address specific difficulties and individual needs of the various teams.

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Introduction to Solid State Physics

APPHY 195A
2021 Fall

Julia Mundy
Monday, Wednesday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

The physics of crystalline solids and their electric, magnetic, optical, and thermal properties. Designed as a first course in solid-state physics. Topics: free electron model; Drude model; the physics of crystal binding; crystal structure and vibration (phonons); x-ray diffraction; electrons in solids (Bloch theorem) and electronic band structures; metals and insulators; semiconductors (and their applications in pn junctions and transistors); magnetism; superconductivity.

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Introduction to Quantum Materials and Devices

APPHY 195B
2022 Spring

Robert Westervelt
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

This course provides an introduction to quantum materials and devices, including low-dimensional materials, single and double quantum dots, Josephson junctions, and graphene. Their behavior is explained using quantum and semiclassical transport, the Coulomb blockade, and superconductivity. Quantum devices offer new approaches for electronics and photonics.

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Quantum and Classical Electromagnetic Interaction with Matter

APPHY 216
2022 Spring

Donhee Ham
Monday, Wednesday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

The first half of the course will cover the interaction of quantized atoms with electromagnetic fields, introducing a number of basic concepts such as coherent Rabi transitions vs. rate-equation dynamics, stimulated & spontaneous transitions, and energy & phase relaxations. These will be then used to study a range of applications of atom-field interactions, such as nuclear magnetic resonance, molecular beam and paramagnetic masers, passive and active atomic clocks, dynamic nuclear polarization, pulse sequence techniques to coherently manipulate atomic quantum states, and laser oscillators with applications. We will also touch upon the interaction of quantized atoms with quantized fields, discussing the atom + photon (Jaynes-Cummings) Hamiltonian, dressed states, and cavity quantum electrodynamics. The second half will cover the classical interaction of electromagnetic fields with matter, with special attentions to collective electrodynamics in particular, magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics with applications in astrophysics, space physics, and Bloch electrons in crystalline solids.

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Introduction to Soft Matter

APPHY 225
2021 Fall

David Weitz
Tuesday, Thursday
10:30am to 11:45am

This course will present a survey of soft matter physics, providing an overview of the richness and breadth of the field. The emphasis will be on the physics of the systems, rather than on the formalism. It will cover most of the fields of interest within soft matter physics, both current and through the history of the field. The course is intended to be of value to both experimentalists and theorists.

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Chemistry in Materials Science and Engineering

APPHY 235
2021 Fall

Joanna Aizenberg
Monday, Wednesday
4:30pm to 5:45pm

Select topics in materials chemistry, focusing on chemical bonds, crystal chemistry, organic and polymeric materials, hybrid materials, surfaces and interfaces, self-assembly, electrochemistry, biomaterials, and bio-inspired materials synthesis.

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Solids: Structure and Defects

APPHY 282
2021 Fall

Frans Spaepen
Tuesday, Thursday
9:00am to 10:15am

Bonding, crystallography, diffraction, phase diagrams, microstructure, point defects, dislocations, and grain boundaries.

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Statistical Mechanics

APPHY 284
2021 Fall

Vinothan Manoharan
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

Basic principles of statistical physics with applications including: the equilibrium properties of classical and quantum gases; phase diagrams, phase transitions and critical points, as illustrated by the gas-liquid transition and simple magnetic models; Bose-Einstein condensation.

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Electron Microscopy Laboratory

APPHY 291
2022 Spring

David Bell
Monday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

Lectures and laboratory instruction on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Cs corrected, aberration-correction microscopy and microanalysis. Lab classes include; diffraction, dark field imaging, X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, atomic imaging, materials sample preparation, polymers, and biological samples.

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Introduction to Quantum Theory of Solids

APPHY 295A
2021 Fall

David R. Nelson
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

This is an introductory graduate level course in solid-state physics. Lattices and symmetries. Phonons. Electronic Structure of Crystals. Metals, semiconductors, and insulators will be covered. Electrical, optical, and thermal properties of solids will be treated based on an atomic scale picture and using the independent electron approximation. Additional topics from the theory of interacting electrons, including introduction to magnetism and superconductivity, and an introduction to topological insulators.

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Quantum Theory of Solids

APPHY 295B
2022 Spring

Ashvin Vishwanath
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

A course on the application of the principles of many-particle quantum mechanics to the properties of solids. The objective is to make students familiar with the tools of second quantization and diagrammatic perturbation theory, while describing the theory of the electron liquid, the BCS theory of superconductivity, and theory of magnetism in metals and insulators. Modern topics on correlated electron systems will occupy the latter part of the course.

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Mesoscale and Low Dimensional Devices

APPHY 296
2021 Fall

Donhee Ham
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

Concepts of condensed matter physics are applied to the science and technology of beyond-CMOS devices, in particular, mesoscale, low-dimensional, and superconducting devices. Topics include: quantum dots/wires/wells and two-dimensional (2D) materials; optoelectronics with confined electrons; conductance quantization, Landauer-Buttiker formalism, and resonant tunneling; magneto oscillation; integer and fractional quantum Hall effects; Berry phase and topology in condensed matter physics; various Hall effects (anomalous, spin, valley, etc.); Weyl semimetal; topological insulator; spintronic devices and circuits; collective electron behaviors in low dimensions and applications; Cooper-pair boxes and superconducting quantum circuits.

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Special Topics in Applied Physics

APPHY 299R
2021 Fall

Federico Capasso

Supervision of experimental or theoretical research on acceptable problems in applied physics and supervision of reading on topics not covered by regular courses of instruction.

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Special Topics in Applied Physics

APPHY 299R
2022 Spring

Federico Capasso

Supervision of experimental or theoretical research on acceptable problems in applied physics and supervision of reading on topics not covered by regular courses of instruction.

Course Website