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Course Listing

For a snapshot of courses being offered by Harvard School of Engineering over the next four years, visit our multi-year course planning tool.

Physiological Systems Analysis

BE 110
2020 Fall

Maurice Smith
Monday, Wednesday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

A survey of systems theory with applications from bioengineering and physiology. Analysis: differential equations, linear and nonlinear systems, stability, the complementary nature of time and frequency domain methods, feedback, and biological oscillations. Applications: nerve function, muscle dynamics, cardiovascular regulation. Laboratory: neural models, feedback control systems, properties of muscle, cardiovascular function.

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Tissue Engineering

BE 125
2021 Spring

David Mooney
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

Fundamental engineering and biological principles underlying field of tissue engineering, along with examples and strategies to engineer specific tissues for clinical use. Students will prepare a paper in the field of tissue engineering, and participate in a weekly laboratory in which they will learn and use methods to fabricate materials and perform 3-D cell culture.

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Introduction to Biomedical Imaging and Systems

BE 128
2021 Spring

Linsey Moyer
Tuesday, Thursday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

The course is designed as an introduction for students who want to gain both hands on training as well as an introduction to the physics and image reconstruction techniques involved in generating images. The course will introduce the fundamentals of the major imaging modalities including, but not limited to: electron microscopy, optical microscopy, x-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, MRI, and nuclear imaging, as well as an overview of in vivo imaging and molecular imaging.

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Introduction to Bioelectronics

BE 129
2021 Spring

Jia Liu
Monday, Wednesday
10:30am to 11:45am

This course provides an introduction to bioelectronics and its applications in neuroscience, neuroengineering, cardiology, wearable technology and so on. The focus is on the basic principles of bioelectricity, biochemistry and physiological behaviors of biological systems and how to design tools to precisely measure and control them. Key themes throughout the course will include bioelectricity, biochemistry, cellular and tissue physiological behavior, optogenetics, sensors, stimulators, circuits, signals, biointerface and applications. This includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic.

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Neural Control of Movement

BE 130
2021 Spring

Maurice Smith
Monday, Wednesday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

Approaches from robotics, control theory, and neuroscience for understanding biological motor systems. Analytical and computational modeling of muscles, reflex arcs, and neural systems that contribute to motor control in the brain. Focus on understanding how the central nervous system plans and controls voluntary movement of the eyes and limbs. Learning and memory; effects of variability and noise on optimal motor planning and control in biological systems.

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Neuroengineering

BE 131
2020 Fall

Jia Liu
Monday, Wednesday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

This course provides an introduction to biological neural systems, and current engineering efforts to understand, control, and enhance the function of neural systems. The focus is on the basic knowledge of molecular basis, anatomic structures, and electrical functions of central and peripheral nervous systems, and the most state-of-the-art genetic/genomic, optical, electrical, magnetic, and computational tools for nervous systems. Key themes throughout the course will include structures of central and peripheral nervous systems, genetic engineering, RNA sequencing, optogenetics, microscope, bioelectronics, MRI, and computational neuroscience. This includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic.

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Introduction to Biomaterials

BE 191
2021 Spring

Jennifer Lewis
Tuesday, Thursday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

A biomaterial is any form of matter that is produced by or interacts with biological systems. One of the pillars of biomedical engineering is to use naturally derived and synthetic biomaterials to treat, augment, or replace human tissues. This course examines the structure, properties and processing of biomaterials.

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Product and Experience Design for Desirability

ENG-SCI 22
2021 Spring

B. Ames Altringer
Tuesday, Thursday
3:45pm to 5:45pm

Multi-disciplinary, project-based course for students interested in designing products, services, or ambitious art or educational works that are meaningful, beautiful, useful, as simple as possible, and emotionally desirable (e.g., calming, inspiring, delightful, cool, covetable.). Students learn the fundamentals of design theory, emotional design, user-centered design, and design leadership. The class format consists of a series of project-based design challenges, and each challenge has three parts. The first part is a summary of the scientific literature on an important emotional concept that is relevant to design, such as trust, anxiety reduction, or belonging. The second part includes one or more case studies of past works that were exceptionally well designed for this emotional concept. The third part is a custom design challenge for students to practice applying what they are learning to their own creative ideas. Past project prompts include challenges like designing headphones for anxiety reduction, health literacy campaigns for rapid adoption, and sustainable materials like bamboo to represent the future of luxury. Along with this cycle of theory and application, the course teaches research-based design process and design leadership skills. Weekly critique panels enable students to develop and refine their own design point of view. The final project in the course is a professional design portfolio.

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Flavor Molecules of Food Fermentation: Exploration and Inquiry

ENG-SCI 24
2021 Spring

Pia Sorensen
Monday, Wednesday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

Microorganisms produce a diverse array of specialized small molecules as part of their metabolic processes. In this course we will study the production, properties, and characterization of these molecules through the lens of food fermentation. In particular, we will focus on the small molecules that contribute taste and aroma in fermented foods. Students will experience the scientific inquiry process in a creative way by designing and implementing their own research project based on a fermented food of their choosing. Still a field with much potential for discovery, interested students are invited to continue their research project in the summer.

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Humanity and its Futures: Systems Thinking Approaches

ENG-SCI 26
2021 Spring

Fawwaz Habbal, Vikram Mansharamani
Monday
9:00am to 11:45am

As citizens in a rapidly changing world facing increasingly complex challenges, the skills that tomorrow’s leaders need are increasingly crossing disciplinary silos. Humanity’s most pressing problems are interconnected, involve competing interests, and defy simplification into single disciplines.  Reductionist approaches focused on linear understanding must be balanced against the integrative logic of systems-oriented thinking.  Depth must be balanced with breadth.
This course will give students an appreciation for the complexities of today’s most intractable problems, and in so doing, help students develop a methodology for navigating the world they will face.  After an overview of systems thinking and its emphasis on interconnections and feedback loops, the course will explore several issues and the complications they generate.  Over the course of the semester, topics including epidemics, inequality, human displacement, and food systems will be addressed.
The course will employ multiple methods of learning, with course preparation varying from reading novels to watching videos to reviewing academic papers. Each case will include an overview of the issue and why it matters, before exploring existing disciplinary approaches to address the challenge. Prior thinking is evaluated both in terms of its rigor and is effectiveness.  What worked and didn’t work? Why?
Students will learn to employ systems thinking using a multi-disciplinary method to evaluate possible solutions.  This future-oriented analysis will emphasize the necessity to zoom out and paint a mosaic of possible unintended consequences and roadblocks that may impede progress. By the end of the course, students should have developed a robust framework for integrating economic, political, technical, ethical, and social lenses into an analysis of complex problems and their potential solutions.

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Aesthetic Pleasure and Smart Design: Janus Faces the Future

ENG-SCI 27
2021 Spring

Fawwaz Habbal, Doris Sommer
Tuesday
9:45am to 11:45am

Engineers today can make almost anything they think of. Do we ask why to pursue one innovation over another? This course considers the personal and social drivers of innovation, including beauty and sustainable value. Complex or “wicked” problems today demand interdisciplinary approaches that bring the Humanities in dialogue with Technology. Along with predicting the success of new products through existing needs and desires, innovation in its most spectacular cases comes close to art, making new and unpredictable things that generate new desires, markets, and behaviors. How will engineers today respond to the opportunities and obligations that accompany technological advances?

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Introduction to Electrical Engineering

ENG-SCI 50
2021 Spring

Marko Loncar, Chris Lombardo
Monday, Wednesday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

The main course objectives are to introduce students to the exciting and powerful world of electrical engineering and to explain how gadgets that we use every day actually work. After taking ES 50, you will be able to leverage the power of electricity to build systems that sense, control and program the physical world around you. Examples include intelligent and autonomous systems (robots), audio amplifiers (e.g. guitar amp), interactive art installations, light-shows, mind-controlled machines, and so on.

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Computer-Aided Machine Design

ENG-SCI 51
2020 Fall

Michelle Rosen
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
10:30am to 11:45am

An introductory course in the design, fabrication, and assembly of mechanical and electromechanical devices. Topics include: Engineering graphics and tolerances; Structural design and material selection; Machine elements and two-dimensional mechanisms; DC motors; Design methodology. Emphasis on hands-on work and team design projects using professional solid modeling CAD software and numerically controlled machine tools.

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Computer-Aided Machine Design

ENG-SCI 51
2021 Spring

Michelle Rosen

An introductory course in the design, fabrication, and assembly of mechanical and electromechanical devices. Topics include: Engineering graphics and tolerances; Structural design and material selection; Machine elements and two-dimensional mechanisms; DC motors; Design methodology. Emphasis on hands-on work and team design projects using professional solid modeling CAD software and numerically controlled machine tools.

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Computer-Aided Machine Design

ENG-SCI 51
2021 Spring

Michelle Rosen
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
10:30am to 11:45am

An introductory course in the design, fabrication, and assembly of mechanical and electromechanical devices. Topics include: Engineering graphics and tolerances; Structural design and material selection; Machine elements and two-dimensional mechanisms; DC motors; Design methodology. Emphasis on hands-on work and team design projects using professional solid modeling CAD software and numerically controlled machine tools.

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Quantitative Physiology as a Basis for Bioengineering

ENG-SCI 53
2020 Fall

Daniel Needleman, Linsey Moyer
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

This course is designed as an introduction to thinking as a bio/biomedical engineer and is recommended for first years and sophomores but open to all students. Simple mathematical models are used to represent key aspects of organ systems function. Core engineering concepts are explored through mechanical and electrical examples within the human body. The primary focus is on quantitative descriptions of organ systems function and control in terms of physical principles and physiologic mechanisms. It includes a foundation in human organ systems physiology, including cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal systems. Emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which dysfunction in these systems gives rise to common human disease processes.

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Humanitarian Design Projects

ENG-SCI 91HFR
2020 Fall

Chris Lombardo
Tuesday
6:00pm to 7:15pm

Multi-year long team projects that provide an engineering experience working with partner communities on real-world problems. Projects provide exposure to problem definition, quantitative analysis, modeling, generation of creative solutions utilizing appropriate technology, engineering design trade-offs, and documentation/communication skills. These projects will be implemented with our project partners after the appropriate design and approvals have been obtained.

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Humanitarian Design Projects

ENG-SCI 91HFR
2021 Spring

Chris Lombardo
Tuesday
6:00pm to 7:15pm

Multi-year long team projects that provide an engineering experience working with partner communities on real-world problems. Projects provide exposure to problem definition, quantitative analysis, modeling, generation of creative solutions utilizing appropriate technology, engineering design trade-offs, and documentation/communication skills. These projects will be implemented with our project partners after the appropriate design and approvals have been obtained.

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Entrepreneurship and Innovation: Practical and Academic Insights

ENG-SCI 94
2021 Spring

Josh Lerner
Monday, Wednesday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

Entrepreneurship is increasingly transforming our society and economy. This course aims to provide for undergraduates an introduction to entrepreneurship and its implications for innovation. The class will primarily consist of case study discussions, but will include some traditional lecture sessions that built on academic papers to provide more frameworks. As such, it draws primarily on materials from the introductory MBA course at Harvard Business School, “The Entrepreneurial Manager” (TEM). Students will be expected to come to class prepared to discuss the cases.

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Startup R & D

ENG-SCI 95R
2020 Fall

Paul Bottino
Tuesday
3:00pm to 5:45pm

Students do field-based work in entrepreneurship to develop their existing startup and explore new ideas and opportunities for startup design. The course is for students seeking innovation experience as a founder of a startup. Students may work individually; teams are preferred. Requires self-directed, independent work and active outreach to mentors, customers, and partners for guidance and feedback in addition to that provided by the instructor. Students will share their work regularly and engage in a peer-to-peer feedback forum. The coursework is customized to the needs of each student and their startup role and includes development of product, technology, market, business, organization and leadership.

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Startup R & D

ENG-SCI 95R
2021 Spring

Paul Bottino
Tuesday
3:00pm to 5:45pm

Students do field-based work in entrepreneurship to develop their existing startup and explore new ideas and opportunities for startup design. The course is for students seeking innovation experience as a founder of a startup. Students may work individually; teams are preferred. Requires self-directed, independent work and active outreach to mentors, customers, and partners for guidance and feedback in addition to that provided by the instructor. Students will share their work regularly and engage in a peer-to-peer feedback forum. The coursework is customized to the needs of each student and their startup role and includes development of product, technology, market, business, organization and leadership.

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Engineering Problem Solving and Design Project

ENG-SCI 96
2020 Fall

David Mooney
Monday, Wednesday
9:00am to 11:45am

Semester-long team-based project providing experience working with clients on complex multi-stakeholders real problems. Course provides exposure to problem definition, problem framing, qualitative and quantitative research methods, modeling, generation and co-design of creative solutions, engineering design trade-offs, and documentation/communication skills. Ordinarily taken in the junior year.

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Engineering Problem Solving and Design Project

ENG-SCI 96
2021 Spring

Fawwaz Habbal, Federico Capasso, Kelly Miller, Jeffrey Paten, Nabil Harfoush
Monday, Wednesday
3:00pm to 5:45pm

Semester-long team-based project providing experience working with clients on complex multi-stakeholders real problems. Course provides exposure to problem definition, problem framing, qualitative and quantitative research methods, modeling, generation and co-design of creative solutions, engineering design trade-offs, and documentation/communication skills. Ordinarily taken in the junior year.

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Engineering Design Projects

ENG-SCI 100HFA
2020 Fall

James Anderson, Anas Chalah, Chris Lombardo, Linsey Moyer, Michelle Rosen, Patrick Ulrich, Peter Zoogman
Thursday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

Individual engineering design projects which demonstrate mastery of engineering knowledge and techniques. During the year, each student will pursue an appropriate capstone project which involves both engineering design and quantitative analysis and culminating in a final oral presentation and final report/thesis.  Students must complete both parts of this course, fall and spring, in order to receive credit.

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Engineering Design Projects

ENG-SCI 100HFB
2021 Spring

James Anderson, Anas Chalah, Chris Lombardo, Linsey Moyer, Michelle Rosen, Patrick Ulrich, Peter Zoogman

Individual engineering design projects which demonstrate mastery of engineering knowledge and techniques. During the year, each student will pursue an appropriate capstone project which involves both engineering design and quantitative analysis and culminating in a final oral presentation and final report/thesis.  Students must complete both parts of this course, fall and spring, in order to receive credit. 

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Thermodynamics by Case Study

ENG-SCI 112
2021 Spring

Scot Martin
Monday, Wednesday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

Fundamental concepts and formalisms of conservation of energy and increase of entropy as applied to natural and engineered environmental and biological systems. Pedagogical approach is to start with real-world observations and applications, extracting the underlying fundamentals of thermodynamics from these.

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Mathematical Modeling

ENG-SCI 115
2021 Spring

Zhiming Kuang
Tuesday, Thursday
10:30am to 11:45am

Abstracting the essential components and mechanisms from a natural system to produce a mathematical model, which can be analyzed with a variety of formal mathematical methods, is perhaps the most important, but least understood, task in applied mathematics. This course approaches a number of problems without the prejudice of trying to apply a particular method of solution. Topics drawn from biology, economics, engineering, physical and social sciences.

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Introduction to the Mechanics of Solids

ENG-SCI 120
2021 Spring

Joost Vlassak
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

A first course in the mechanical sciences which introduces elements of continuum mechanics and explains how materials and structures stretch, bend, twist, shake, buckle, and break. Stress-strain behavior of materials. Statically determinate and indeterminate structures. Stress and strain, equations of motion or equilibrium, strain-displacement relations. Torsion. Beam theory with applications to beam deflections, vibrations, and buckling. Three laboratory sessions required.

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Introduction to Optimization: Models and Methods

ENG-SCI 121
2020 Fall

Yiling Chen, Margo Levine
Monday, Wednesday
10:30am to 11:45am

Introduction to basic mathematical ideas and computational methods for solving deterministic optimization problems. Topics covered: linear programming, integer programming, branch-and-bound, branch-and-cut. Emphasis on modeling. Examples from business, society, engineering, sports, e-commerce. Exercises in AMPL, complemented by Mathematica or Matlab.

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Introduction to Optimization: Models and Methods

ENG-SCI 121
2020 Fall

Yiling Chen, Margo Levine
Monday, Wednesday
9:00pm to 10:15pm

Introduction to basic mathematical ideas and computational methods for solving deterministic optimization problems. Topics covered: linear programming, integer programming, branch-and-bound, branch-and-cut. Emphasis on modeling. Examples from business, society, engineering, sports, e-commerce. Exercises in AMPL, complemented by Mathematica or Matlab.

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Introduction to Fluid Mechanics and Transport Processes

ENG-SCI 123
2021 Spring

Petros Koumoutsakos
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
10:30am to 11:45am

Panta rhei; Energy and Entropy; Atomistic-Mesoscale-Continuum Fluids and Flows; Dimensional Analysis; Atomistic descriptions of Liquids, Gases and their interfaces;  Atomistic, Mesoscale, Continuum descriptions of Diffusion Processes; Surface Tension: bubbles and droplets; Fluid kinematics; Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions; Macroscale conservation laws for incompressible flows; Mass conservation and potential flows; Momentum conservation and the Navier-Stokes equations; Vorticity and Vortices; Lift and Drag in Aerodynamics; Flows in Pipes and Channels; Elementary concepts of Turbulent flows.

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Mechanical Systems

ENG-SCI 125
2020 Fall

Boris Kozinsky
Monday, Wednesday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

Modeling and analysis of mechanical systems. Topics include 3D rigid body dynamics, resonance, damping, frequency response, Laplace transform methods, Lagrange's equations, multiple degree-of-freedom systems and an introduction to control and continuous systems. Analytical modeling will be supplemented with numerical simulations and lab experiments. Laboratory exercises will explore vibration, and stabilization using data acquisition systems.

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Computational Solid and Structural Mechanics

ENG-SCI 128
2020 Fall

Katia Bertoldi
Tuesday, Thursday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

Introduction to finite element methods for analysis of steady-state and transient problems in solid and structural mechanics. Implementation of simple MATLAB codes and use of existing general-purpose software (ABAQUS). Final project offers opportunities to extend focus to fluid mechanics and heat transfer and to explore additional software (e.g. COMSOL, FEniCS), if desired.

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Computational Solid and Structural Mechanics

ENG-SCI 128
2021 Spring

Katia Bertoldi
Monday, Wednesday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

Introduction to finite element methods for analysis of steady-state and transient problems in solid and structural mechanics. Implementation of simple MATLAB codes and use of existing general-purpose software (ABAQUS). Final project offers opportunities to extend focus to fluid mechanics and heat transfer and to explore additional software (e.g. COMSOL, FEniCS), if desired.

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Innovation in Science and Engineering: Conference Course

ENG-SCI 139
2020 Fall

David Weitz
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

Explores factors and conditions contributing to innovation in science and engineering; how important problems are found, defined, and solved; roles of teamwork and creativity; and applications of these methods to other endeavors. Students receive practical and professional training in techniques to define and solve problems, and in brainstorming and other individual and team approaches.

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Computer Vision

ENG-SCI 143
2020 Fall

Todd Zickler
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

An introduction to the mathematical, optical, and computational foundations of computer vision, with a focus on applications in augmented reality and robotic perception. Topics include: camera optics, digital color photography pipelines, multi-camera geometry, image processing and manipulation, simultaneous localization and mapping, lighting and material estimation, and 3D scanning. Emphasis on combining mathematical modeling with robust algorithms for solving ill-posed problems.

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Probability with Engineering Applications

ENG-SCI 150
2021 Spring

Yue Lu
Tuesday, Thursday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

This course introduces the fundamentals of probability theory for parameter estimation and decision making under uncertainty. It considers applications to information systems as well as other physical and biological systems. Topics include: discrete and continuous random variables, conditional expectations, Bayes’ rules, laws of large numbers, central limit theorems, Markov chains, Bayesian statistical inferences, and parameter estimations.

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Circuits, Devices, and Transduction

ENG-SCI 152
2020 Fall

Gu-Yeon Wei
Monday, Wednesday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

This course introduces fundamentals in designing and building modern information devices and systems that interface with the real world. It focuses on devices and systems that use analog electronics, and it complements COMPSCI 141, which focuses on digital devices and systems. Topics of this course include: time and frequency domain analysis of simple 1st and 2nd order circuits; operational amplifiers and op-amp circuits; basic semiconductor physics; PN junctions and diodes; bipolar junction transistors (BJT); field-effect transistors (MOSFETs); bias circuits and current sources; amplifier gain and bandwidth; frequency response, feedback, noise, and stability. Further, students are introduced to select transducers, particularly motors and their concomitant drive schemes, but also photocells, photodiodes, and semiconductor lasers to highlight device design and characterization.

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Systems and Control

ENG-SCI 155
2020 Fall

Na Li, Yue Lu
Monday, Wednesday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

This course and its follow-on course ENG-SCI 156 concern the fundamentals of information systems in the real world. Together they provide a comprehensive foundation in signal processing, systems design and analysis, control, and communications, while also introducing key linear-algebraic concepts in the context of authentic applications. The first course, ENG-SCI 155, focuses on the basic principles of feedback and its use as a tool for inferring and/or altering the dynamics of systems under uncertainty. Topics include linear algebra, the elemental representations of dynamic systems, stability analysis, the design of estimators (e.g., Kalman Filter) and feedback controllers (e.g., PID and Optimal Controller). The class includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic.

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Signals and Communications

ENG-SCI 156
2021 Spring

Flavio du Pin Calmon, Todd Zickler
Monday, Wednesday
10:30am to 11:45am

This course is a follow-on to ENG-SCI 155 and continues to develop the fundamentals of information systems in the real world. It focuses on the analysis and manipulation of signals in the time and frequency domains in the context of authentic applications. Topics include: the sampling theorem, convolution, and linear input-output systems in continuous and discrete time. Further, students are introduced to transforms—including Fourier, discrete cosine, wavelet, and PCA / SVD ‘transforms’—that map between vector spaces via matrix multiplication as a method to ease analysis provided conditionalized knowledge. Randomness, noise, and filtering. Waves and interference in the context of communications; antennae, phasors, modulation, multiplexing. Applications in communications and data science.

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Biological Signal Processing

ENG-SCI 157
2020 Fall

Demba Ba
Tuesday, Thursday
10:30am to 11:45am

This is the first course on Biological Signal Processing, the science of collection, representation, manipulation, transformation, storing of biological signals, and the use of modern scientific computing tools (Python, Jupyter notebooks) to interpret biological signals and tell engaging and informative stories using biological data. The signals of interest can be deterministic, semi-periodic, transient, random, stationary, non-stationary, etc., depending on their source and generation mechanism. We will use EEG, EKG, temperature data, neural spiking data, and data from Covid-19 as examples. Our focus will be on foundational signal processing concepts that can be applied in a variety of biological applications. Examples include the Fourier Transform, Principal Component Analysis, Clustering, etc. Applications include those to patient monitoring, diagnostics, patient prognostics, online monitoring, and the computation of wellness measures. For many of us, one frustrating aspect of Covid-19 is our inability to understand figures that are reported, such as infection rates and numbers. We will introduce you to a powerful suite of mathematical and scientific computing tools will enable you to evaluate and make decisions based on evidence and data.

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Introduction to Quantum Materials and Devices

ENG-SCI 171
2021 Spring

Robert Westervelt

This course provides an introduction to quantum materials and devices, including two-dimensional electron layers, single and double quantum dots, 2D materials such as graphene, and Josephson junctions. Their behavior is explained using semiclassical and quantum transport, electron states in reduced dimensions, the Coulomb blockade, and superconductivity. Quantum devices offer new approaches to electronics and photonics.

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Introduction to Electronic and Photonic Devices

ENG-SCI 173
2020 Fall

Evelyn Hu
Tuesday, Thursday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

This course will focus on physical principles underlying semiconductor devices: electrons and holes in semiconductors , energies and bandgaps, transport properties of electrons and holes, p-n junctions, transistors, light emitting diodes, lasers, solar cells and thermoelectric devices.

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Engineering Thermodynamics

ENG-SCI 181
2020 Fall

Michael Aziz
Tuesday, Thursday
10:30am to 11:45am

Introduction to classical engineering thermodynamics. Topics: Zeroth Law and temperature. Properties of single-component gases, liquids, and solids. Equations of state for ideal and simple nonideal substances. First Law, heat and heat transfer, work, internal energy, enthalpy. Second Law, Third Law, entropy, free energy, exergy. Heat engines and important engineering applications such as refrigerators, power cycles. Properties and simple models of solutions. Phase and chemical equilibrium in multicomponent systems; chemical potential. Electrochemistry, batteries, fuel cells. Laboratory included.

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Introduction to Heat Transfer

ENG-SCI 183
2021 Spring

David Clarke
Tuesday, Thursday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

The macroscopic description of the fundamentals of heat transfer and applications to practical problems in energy conversion, electronics and living systems with an emphasis on developing a physical and analytical understanding of conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer. Emphasis will also be given to problem solving skills based on applying governing principles, mathematical models and physical intuition. Includes laboratory sessions and semester-long projects.

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Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering

ENG-SCI 190
2020 Fall

Xin Li
Monday, Wednesday
9:00am to 10:15am

Introduction to the structure, properties, and applications of materials. Crystal structure and defects. Structure property relations and crystal symmetry. Phase transformations, phase diagrams, diffusion. Effect of microstructure on properties. Examples from a variety of engineering applications of electrical, optical and magnetic materials.

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Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering

ENG-SCI 190
2020 Fall

Xin Li
Monday, Wednesday
6:00pm to 7:15pm

Introduction to the structure, properties, and applications of materials. Crystal structure and defects. Structure property relations and crystal symmetry. Phase transformations, phase diagrams, diffusion. Effect of microstructure on properties. Examples from a variety of engineering applications of electrical, optical and magnetic materials.

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Materials Selection and Design

ENG-SCI 192
2020 Fall

David Clarke
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

The repertory of materials available to engineers today and embodied in engineering systems includes tens of thousands of different materials, as well as naturally occurring ones. This course addresses why specific materials are selected for particular applications and the rational basis for their selection. The course is intended to serve as an introduction to the principles and methodology of selecting materials for engineering components based on the functionality and purpose of the component in different system applications and operating environments. The selection specification includes satisfying a variety of objectives, such as minimizing weight, cost (financial as well as environmental), end of life recycling and material scarcity.

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Decision Theory

ENG-SCI 201
2021 Spring

Demba Ba
Tuesday, Thursday
10:30am to 11:45am

ES 201/AM 231 is a course in statistical inference and estimation from a signal processing perspective. The course will emphasize the entire pipeline from writing a model, estimating its parameters and performing inference utilizing real data.  The first part of the course will focus on linear and nonlinear probabilistic generative/regression models (e.g. linear, logistic, Poisson regression), and algorithms for optimization (ML/MAP estimation) in these models. We will play particular attention to sparsity-induced regression models, that arise for instance in compressed sensing, because of their relation to artificial neural networks, the topic of the second part of the course.  The second part of the course will introduce students to the nascent and exciting research area of  generative models of deep networks called model-based deep learning. At present, we lack a principled way to design artificial neural networks, the workhorses of modern AI systems. Moreover, modern AI systems lack the ability to explain how they reach their decisions. In other words, we cannot yet call AI explainable or interpretable which, as a society, poses important questions as to the responsible use of such technology. Model-based deep learning provides a framework to develop and constrain neural-network architectures in a principled fashion. We will see, for instance, how neural-networks with ReLU nonlinearities arise from sparse probabilistic generative models introduced in the first part of the course. This will form the basis for a rigorous recipe we will teach you to build interpretable deep neural networks, from the ground up. We will invite an exciting line up of speakers. Speakers will suggest papers that a group of students will present at the beginning of lecture, which will build up to a final project/paper that utilizes/on model-based deep learning applied to problems of interest to students.

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Fluid Dynamics

ENG-SCI 220
2021 Spring

L Mahadevan
Wednesday, Friday
4:30pm to 5:45pm

From statistical to continuum mechanics. Geometry of motion. Strain, strain rate, polarity and nematicity. Vorticity. Conservation laws. Stress - passive and active. Symmetry, invariance and constitutive equations. Dimensional analysis and scaling. Navier-Stokes, Toner-Tu and Nematodynamic equations.  Experimental hydrodynamics. Solutions for simple flow states.   Boundary layers (and engineering flows). Rotating flows (and geophysics).  Thin film flows (and environmental physics).  Active matter flows (and biophysics). Similarity and singularity. Linear and nonlinear waves in passive and active fluids- acoustics, shocks, water waves, bird flocks.  Flow instabilities. Mixing and turbulence.

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Drug Delivery

ENG-SCI 221
2020 Fall

Samir Mitragotri
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

Methods to deliver molecules to the human body. Physiological obstacles and engineering solutions. Characterization techniques for drug delivery synthesis and in vitro analysis. Case studies of current pharmaceutical products.

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Neuroengineering

ENG-SCI 225
2020 Fall

Jia Liu
Monday, Wednesday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

The contents and course requirements are similar to those of Biomedical Engineering 131 (BE 131), with the exception that students enrolled in Engineering Sciences 225 (ENG-SCI 225) are expected to undertake a substantial course project.

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Computational Solid and Structural Mechanics

ENG-SCI 228
2020 Fall

Katia Bertoldi

Introduction to finite element methods for analysis of steady-state and transient problems in solid and structural mechanics. Implementation of simple MATLAB codes and use of existing general-purpose software (ABAQUS). Final project offers opportunities to extend focus to fluid mechanics and heat transfer and to explore additional software (e.g. COMSOL, FEniCS), if desired.

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Computational Solid and Structural Mechanics

ENG-SCI 228
2021 Spring

Katia Bertoldi
Monday, Wednesday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

Introduction to finite element methods for analysis of steady-state and transient problems in solid and structural mechanics. Implementation of simple MATLAB codes and use of existing general-purpose software (ABAQUS). Final project offers opportunities to extend focus to fluid mechanics and heat transfer and to explore additional software (e.g. COMSOL, FEniCS), if desired.

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Survey of Energy Technology

ENG-SCI 229
2021 Spring

Michael Aziz
Wednesday, Friday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

Principles governing energy generation and interconversion. Current and projected world energy use. Selected important current and anticipated future technologies for energy generation, interconversion, storage, and end usage.

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Advanced Tissue Engineering

ENG-SCI 230
2021 Spring

David Mooney
Tuesday, Thursday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

Fundamental engineering and biological principles underlying field of tissue engineering, along with examples and strategies to engineer specific tissues for clinical use. Student design teams prepare a research proposal and participate in a weekly laboratory.

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Energy Technology

ENG-SCI 231
2021 Spring

Michael Aziz
Wednesday, Friday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

Principles governing energy generation and interconversion. Current and projected world energy use. Selected important current and anticipated future technologies for energy generation, interconversion, storage, and end usage.

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Technology Venture Immersion

ENG-SCI 234
2021 Spring

Conor Walsh, Thomas Eisenmann

Using a learning-by-doing approach, student teams will work on their own venture concepts in this intensive immersion course. The course will convey concepts and builds skills required in early stage technology ventures, including problem finding (human-centered design, customer discovery), solution finding (ideation methods, prototyping, user testing), business model validation (hypothesis generation, minimum viable products, lean experimentation), sales and marketing methods, venture financing, and team building and leadership skills. Enrollment limited to first-year MS/MBA: Engineering Sciences students only.

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Solid Mechanics

ENG-SCI 240
2020 Fall

Joost Vlassak
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

Foundations of solid mechanics, development of elasticity theory, and introduction to  linear visco-elasticity and plasticity. Basic elasticity solutions. Variational principles. Deformation of plates. Introduction to large deformation.

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Fracture Mechanics

ENG-SCI 247
2020 Fall

Zhigang Suo
Tuesday, Thursday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

Fundamentals of fracture with applications in materials and structural mechanics. Micromechanics of fracture in ceramics, metals, and polymers. Fracture of composite materials. Interfacial fracture mechanics. Fatigue crack propagation.

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Advanced Neural Control of Movement

ENG-SCI 249
2021 Spring

Maurice Smith
Monday, Wednesday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

Students expected to meet all of the requirements of Biomedical Engineering 130 (formerly Engineering Sciences 149) and in addition to submit a term project with significant analytic content.

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Advanced Topics in Robotics Research

ENG-SCI 252R
2021 Spring

A graduate seminar course on advanced topics in robotics research. Students read and present research papers and undertake a research project. Spring 2021 will focus on robotic grasping and manipulation and surgical robotics.

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Informal Robotics/New Paradigms for Design and Construction

ENG-SCI 256
2021 Spring

Chuck Hoberman
Friday
12:00pm to 1:59pm

This course teaches how to create original robotic devices made of light, compliant – informal – materials.

New fabrication techniques are transforming the field of robotics. Rather than rigid parts connected by mechanical connectors, robots can now be made of folded paper, carbon laminates or soft gels. They can be formed fully integrated from a 3D printer rather than assembled from individual components. Informal Robotics draws on cutting-edge research from leading labs, in particular, Harvard’s Micro Robotics Laboratory which has created unique designs for ambulatory and flying robots, end-effectors, medical instruments and other applications.

We will explore informal robotics from multiple perspectives, culminating with the design of original devices displaying animated intelligence in real-time. Going beyond traditional engineering approaches, we will also explore new opportunities for design at the product, architectural, and urban scales.

Techniques:
Hands-on:  Working with the GSD’s Fab Lab we are creating a kit of parts that will be available to all enrolled students. With the kit, you can create a wide range of folding mechanisms controlled by on-board miniature electronics. 

Software / Simulation: Software workshops will be offered on Fusion 360 and Grasshopper to simulate robotic performance within a virtual environment. 

Topics:
- Kinematics: design techniques for pop-ups, origami, and soft mechanisms.
- Fabrication: methods: for composite materials, laminated assembly, self-folding, and integrated flexures - the kit of parts will allow for hands-on exploration.
- Controls: how to actuate movement and program desired behavior. Topics include servos, linear actuators, and use of Arduino actuator control.
- Applications: takes us beyond purely technological concerns, contextualizing Informal Robotics within larger trends where materials, manufacturing and computation are starting to merge.

Format, prerequisites, evaluation:

A portion of the lecture material will be pre-recorded, allowing students to view this on their own schedule. The class session will emphasize discussion and review of assignments & projects. 

There will be assignments to produce test mechanisms and CAD models, followed by final group projects. Presentations and discussions of ongoing student work are integral to the course. There are no prerequisites and evaluation will be based on completion of assignments and the final project.

Projects may be virtual, physical or both. Resources for fabricating customized final projects are not fully known at this point, but I am committed to supporting physical-making to the degree possible.

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Introduction to Bioelectronics

ENG-SCI 258
2021 Spring

Jia Liu
Monday, Wednesday
10:30am to 11:45am

The contents and course requirements are similar to those of Biomedical Engineering 129 (BE 129), with the exception that students enrolled in Engineering Sciences 258 (ENG-SCI 258) are expected to undertake a substantial course project.

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Stratospheric Dynamics

ENG-SCI 261
2021 Spring

Marianna Linz

This course will review some introductory geophysical fluid dynamics before focusing primarily on the physics of the stratosphere. Topics covered will include eddy transport of heat and momentum, stratospheric Rossby and gravity waves, wave-mean flow interaction, and tracer transport. The course will alternate lecture with in-class coding activities. Each week will have a preparatory reading and brief assignment.

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Topics in Mixed-Signal Integrated Circuits

ENG-SCI 271R
2021 Spring

Gu-Yeon Wei
Tuesday, Thursday
6:00pm to 7:15pm

A seminar course that dives into research and development of various topics in integrated circuits and systems for low-power and/or high-performance computing. The course in Spring 2021 will focus on recent advances in novel devices, circuits, and systems that have been developed for machine learning and AI tasks and applications.

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Optics and Photonics

ENG-SCI 273
2020 Fall

Federico Capasso, Marko Loncar
Monday, Wednesday
3:00pm to 4:15pm

The focus is on the foundations of optics/photonics and on some of its most important modern developments and applications. Powerful and widely used computational tools will be developed in the sections. Topics to be covered: Maxwell's equations, Free space optics. Reflection, refraction, polarization (Jones Calculus and Stokes parameters); interference and diffraction. Light-matter interaction, dispersion and absorption. Guided wave optics (including optical fibers). Perturbation and couple mode theory, transfer matrix methods; numerical methods. Optical resonators.  Photonic crystals. Near-field optics. Metal optics and Plasmonics. Metamaterials and Metasurfaces.

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Quantum Devices

ENG-SCI 274
2020 Fall

Marko Loncar, Federico Capasso
Tuesday, Thursday
12:00pm to 1:15pm

The focus of this course are quantum devices that have revolutionized the field of information science and technology. Particular emphasis this year will be on optical devices and communication technology. First, quantum devices that have enabled development of internet will be discussed, including semiconductor lasers, modulators and photo-detectors. Next, emerging quantum devices that will lead to so-called “second quantum revolution” and development of quantum internet and quantum computers will be introduced. These include single-photon sources and detectors, quantum memories, physical implementations of quantum gates, etc.. Topics that will be covered include quantum dots, color centers in solids, trapped ions and atoms, photon pair generation, quantum teleportation, quantum cryptography and quantum repeaters. The course is a mixture of quantum mechanics, semiconductor device physics, nanophotonics, quantum electronics and quantum optics. 

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Systems Engineering

ENG-SCI 280
2020 Fall

Robert D. Howe, Venkat Venkatasubramanian

This is the first core course for students in the MS/MBA: Engineering Sciences program, to be taken in August of the first year of the program. The course will begin with methods for modeling engineering and business systems, including discrete and continuous systems and feedback controls. Students will write simple simulations and then use professional modeling software to simulate complex systems. Students will next learn design methodology, including stakeholder modeling, ideation, and decision making tools. A final team project will involve design of a system, including simulation and prototyping.

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Integrated Design

ENG-SCI 285
2020 Fall

B. Ames Altringer, Roberto Verganti
Monday, Tuesday
4:30pm to 6:30pm

Leading advanced design projects requires the integration of multiple skill areas and ongoing learning about the best concepts and tools to guide development. This course in leadership and design practice trains students to lead multi-disciplinary, integrated teams capable of envisioning a meaningful project direction and developing seamless product and service experiences. Students learn strategic design and design leadership alongside the history of design and the principles, processes and techniques of intermediate to advanced Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and UX, graphic design, psychology of design, and design decision-making tools and tradeoffs. Students learn the skills needed to become not just an engineer or a manager, but integrated engineer-designers who have the unique capabilities needed to lead entrepreneurial projects. They learn to use collaborative sensemaking to find the most meaningful problem to work on, and to do this through an iterative cycle that integrates the technical, user experience, and interface design elements of a solution. The course is structured to provide a comprehensive education in all stages of the new product design process: from idea generation to concept development, detailed design and prototyping, testing and integrating data into design decisions.

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Nano Micro Macro: Adaptive Material Laboratory

ENG-SCI 291
2021 Spring

Joanna Aizenberg, Jonathan Grinham
Friday
8:00am to 9:59am

This course is an interdisciplinary platform for designers, engineers, and scientists to interact and develop innovative new products. The course introduces ideas-to-innovation processes in a hands-on, project/product focused manner that balance design and engineering concepts with promising, real-world opportunities. Switching back and forth between guided discovery and focused development, between bottom-up and top-down thinking, and market analyses, the course helps students establish generalizable frameworks as researchers and innovators with a focus on new and emerging technologies. There are no prerequisites.

Note! MDE students, this course can satisfy a GSD course requirement by enrolling in SCI 6477, or a SEAS course requirement by enrolling in ES 291. But it cannot simultaneously satisfy both requirements.

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Launch Lab/Capstone 1

ENG-SCI 292A
2021 Spring

Russell J Wilcox, Alan Maccormack

The MS/MBA Capstone is an intensive project that requires teams of students to apply and integrate the skills they have learned across core disciplines developed in the program curriculum. Specifically, teams will be expected to design, build and launch a new technology-based product/service venture, and thereby to demonstrate mastery with respect to three areas of knowledge: Design Knowledge: The use of human-centered design methods to understand users, identify solutions to their needs, and gather feedback via rapid, iterative prototyping. Technical Knowledge: The use of rigorous system engineering methods to plan, design, develop, build, and test a complex technology-based product/service, integrating knowledge across multiple engineering disciplines. Business Knowledge: The use of business model analysis and lean experimentation methods to develop and test a set of hypotheses that capture how the new product/service will create value, including business model design, pricing, sales and marketing, operating model and profit formula.

The Capstone is divided into two parts, the first of which is an immersive course completed during the January term of the G2 year (Capstone I). The subsequent spring course (Capstone II) follows on from and builds upon work completed in January. In Capstone II, dedicated mentors will be allocated to each team based upon the specific projects they are completing. Given students prior coursework, a working knowledge of human-centered design methods, systems engineering techniques, and business modeling and lean experimentation is assumed. Launch Lab therefore focuses on the practical application of these skills to team projects, supplemented by content in three areas: i) seminars on advanced methods and techniques, ii) workshops that demonstrate how to put these skills and tools into practice, and iii) guest speakers who share their experience in the areas of design, technology and business.
 

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Launch Lab/Capstone 2

ENG-SCI 292B
2021 Spring

Russell J Wilcox, Thomas Eisenmann
Monday
4:30pm to 6:30pm

The MS/MBA Capstone is an intensive project that requires teams of students to apply and integrate the skills they have learned across core disciplines developed in the program curriculum. Specifically, teams will be expected to design, build and launch a new technology-based product/service venture, and thereby to demonstrate mastery with respect to three areas of knowledge: Design Knowledge: The use of human-centered design methods to understand users, identify solutions to their needs, and gather feedback via rapid, iterative prototyping. Technical Knowledge: The use of rigorous system engineering methods to plan, design, develop, build, and test a complex technology-based product/service, integrating knowledge across multiple engineering disciplines. Business Knowledge: The use of business model analysis and lean experimentation methods to develop and test a set of hypotheses that capture how the new product/service will create value, including business model design, pricing, sales and marketing, operating model and profit formula.

The Capstone is divided into two parts, the first of which is an immersive course completed during the January term of the G2 year (Capstone I). The subsequent spring course (Capstone II) follows on from and builds upon work completed in January. Given students prior coursework, a working knowledge of human-centered design methods, systems engineering techniques, and business modeling and lean experimentation is assumed. Launch Lab therefore focuses on the practical application of these skills to team projects, supplemented by content in three areas: i) seminars on advanced methods and techniques, ii) workshops that demonstrate how to put these skills and tools into practice, and iii) guest speakers who share their experience in the areas of design, technology and business.
 

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Professional Writing for Scientists and Engineers

ENG-SCI 297
2020 Fall

Jenny Hoffman, Suzanne Smith
Wednesday
3:00pm to 5:00pm

This class leads students to develop their skills in the critical reading and writing of science and engineering. Genres will include research articles, grant proposals, school/fellowship/job applications, or lay abstracts & press releases for the non-scientific public. Crucially, students will be empowered not only to achieve their own writing goals, but also to break down these learned skills and impart them to others, as effective collaborators and mentors of younger students.

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Professional Writing for Scientists and Engineers

ENG-SCI 297
2021 Spring

Jenny Hoffman, Suzanne Smith
Wednesday
3:00pm to 5:00pm

This class leads students to develop their skills in the critical reading and writing of science and engineering. Genres will include research articles, grant proposals, school/fellowship/job applications, or lay abstracts & press releases for the non-scientific public. Crucially, students will be empowered not only to achieve their own writing goals, but also to break down these learned skills and impart them to others, as effective collaborators and mentors of younger students.

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Methods & Practices in Design Engineering

ENG-SCI 298AR
2020 Fall

Nabil Harfoush, Arianna Mazzeo
Thursday
12:00pm to 2:45pm

This course is a practice-focused introduction to applied design research and analysis methods on human subjects (individuals or groups) and on organizations in a post-pandemic urban context. The first part of the course provides an introduction to qualitative research methods such as observation, interviewing and emergent design fiction from a cultural and systemic perspective. The second part introduces learners to key methods and tools for analyzing enterprises and their resilience. The course is intended to complement the knowledge of students in engineering, sciences, and multidisciplinary programs and provide them with practical skills in domains adjacent to their fields. The course is suitable for students and for graduate and undergraduate students of many disciplines.

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Innovating in Health Care

ENG-SCI 298CR
2021 Spring

Regina Herzlinger
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
10:40am to 12:00pm

This course enables students to bring their entrepreneurial health care ventures to market by: 1) Learning how to align their venture with the six factors that influence entrepreneurial ventures - the structure of the health care system, its financing, technology, consumers, accountability, and public policy; and 2) Learning the nine essential elements of a business model. The course uses case studies of all kinds of health care innovations – delivery, med tech, insurance, biopharma – in global settings and lectures on subjects such as reimbursement to enable these learnings. Students apply these learnings to complete a business plan for an entrepreneurial venture. The project can be completed with a team of classmates.

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Methodologies in Design Engineering

ENG-SCI 298DR
2020 Fall

Kit Parker, Fawwaz Habbal
Friday
11:00am to 1:00pm

This is a SAT/UNSAT seminar course focused on design thinking, analysis, planning, and executing the development of engineered systems. Weekly meetings will include discussions and assigned readings of case studies and examples of the systems surrounding the developing technical system. Organizing and executing research, innovation, and product design at the scales from academic group, to startup, to major industry will be discussed. The course is designed to allow the engineer and designer to integrate technical knowledge into an executable framework as an individual or leader of a design team.

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Solving Tech’s Public Dilemmas

ENG-SCI 298R
2020 Fall

Ash Carter
Monday, Wednesday
1:30pm to 2:45pm

This course identifies and analyzes alternative solutions to the dilemmas that disruptive technology is posing to public good in the digital, biotech, and jobs and training domains. The objective is for students to craft technologically-informed practical public-private approaches to some of the key policy issues of our time. It begins with a brief history of successful and unsuccessful governance of far-reaching technological changes in the past. The first part of the course treats the ongoing digital revolution, crafting solutions to issues of social media responsibility, cybersecurity, and artificial intelligence (AI).  It then turns to the biotech revolution that is gathering momentum, addressing genome editing, bioweapons and bioterror, and the role of venture capital in biotech. The third segment of the course addresses the ways that technology is disrupting the nature of work and lifelong training. The example of driverless cars will be used to illustrate the challenges and opportunities that technology provides to sustain cohesive and prosperous societies in the era of tech "disruption". Assignments stress development of key writing and speaking skills.

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Special Topics in Engineering Sciences

ENG-SCI 299R
2020 Fall

Fawwaz Habbal

Supervision of experimental or theoretical research on acceptable problems in engineering and applied science and supervision of reading on topics not covered by regular courses of instruction.

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Special Topics in Engineering Sciences

ENG-SCI 299R
2021 Spring

Fawwaz Habbal

Supervision of experimental or theoretical research on acceptable problems in engineering and applied science and supervision of reading on topics not covered by regular courses of instruction.

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